Mass of a Boxer: Find with k and x

In summary, the conversation is about a spring with a force constant of 2.1 x 10^4 N/m being compressed by a boxer's weight and the task of finding the mass of the boxer using the formula F = kx. The original poster is reminded to show their own efforts before seeking help and the conversation ends with the conclusion that the formula for scales is essentially the same.
  • #1
6
0
Springs and... mass??

A spring with a force constant of 2.1 x 10^4 N/m compresses 0.035m when stepped on by a boxer. The mass of the boxer is...?

k = 2.1 x 10^4 N/m
x = 0.035m

how would you be able to find the mass for this?
 
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  • #2
Welcome to PF sup90.

You are expected to show your own efforts on a problem before anyone helps you. What have you tried? What are your thoughts on the problem? What formulas relate to the problem in question. What section of your textbook does the problem relate to? Answer these questions, and we'll be able to help you.

Also, please post all homework type problems in the homework help section of the site next time.
 
  • #3
F=Kx
That is Force (in this case weight) = Force constant * change in length.
Hope this helps.
 
  • #4
madmike159 said:
F=Kx
That is Force (in this case weight) = Force constant * change in length.
Hope this helps.

There is a reason we require students to show work before we help them Mike.

How does just giving him an answer without him doing ANY work, help him in the end?
 
  • #5
sorry for the late reply, yes i go that far..

F = kx
plug F into F = mg; knowing that g = 9.8

and solve for m?

i'm i on the right track?
 
  • #6
I just gave him what he needs to work it out, I don't see how else I could help. Giving him a like to something would just be a longer way of helping him.
 
  • #7
yes sup, what you said is right. That is essentially how scales work.
 
  • #8
thank you for your time and help guys =D
 
  • #9
madmike159 said:
I just gave him what he needs to work it out, I don't see how else I could help. Giving him a like to something would just be a longer way of helping him.

Yes, you did indeed help him solve the problem, but I'm just pointing out, for next time, that the rules are that you shouldn't offer help until the original poster shows work. Those are the forum rules.
 

1. What is the mass of a boxer?

The mass of a boxer refers to the amount of matter that makes up their body, typically measured in kilograms (kg). It can vary depending on the individual boxer's build, muscle mass, and weight class.

2. How do you find the mass of a boxer?

The mass of a boxer can be found by using the equation: mass = k * x, where k is a constant value and x is the force applied to the boxer's body. This equation is based on Newton's Second Law of Motion, which states that force is equal to mass times acceleration.

3. What is the value of k in the mass equation for a boxer?

The value of k in the mass equation for a boxer can vary depending on the units used for mass and force. However, in most cases, the value of k is equal to 1, as mass is typically measured in kilograms and force is measured in newtons.

4. How do you measure the force applied to a boxer's body?

The force applied to a boxer's body can be measured using a force meter or by calculating the force based on the boxer's velocity and acceleration. This force can then be used in the mass equation to determine the boxer's mass.

5. Can the mass of a boxer change?

Yes, the mass of a boxer can change over time. Factors such as diet, training, and overall health can impact a boxer's mass. Additionally, as a boxer gains or loses muscle mass, their overall mass will also change.

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