Nuclear Stability: A Comparison of Binding Energy and Packing Fraction

In summary, the binding energy per nucleon and packing fraction are both measures of a nucleus's stability, but they are calculated using different definitions of mass defect. A higher binding energy per nucleon indicates a more stable nucleus, while a smaller packing fraction does not necessarily indicate a less stable nucleus despite the formula BE/A=PF*c^2. This discrepancy can be solved by understanding the different definitions and contexts of mass defect.
  • #1
Krushnaraj Pandya
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Homework Statement


This is a conceptual question I have, the binding energy per nucleon is mass defect*c^2/mass number while the packing fraction is mass defect/mass number. A higher binding energy per nucleon indicates a more stable nucleus BUT a smaller packing fraction indicates a more stable nucleus as well despite BE/A=PF*c^2 as per the formulas- what blunder am I making?

Homework Equations


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The Attempt at a Solution


mentioned above
 
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  • #2
Let me re-frame the question, a higher mass defect means more energy to hold the nucleus together and a smaller atomic mass means less nucleons and radius, according to this a higher packing fraction should indicate a more stable nucleus not a less stable one, I'd be really grateful for any help to understand this-Thank you
 
  • #3
can anyone solve this discrepancy?
 
  • #4
Packing fraction is a term from mass spectrometry, in which "mass defect" is defined differently than in nuclear physics.
 

Related to Nuclear Stability: A Comparison of Binding Energy and Packing Fraction

1. What is nuclear stability?

Nuclear stability refers to the tendency of an atom's nucleus to remain intact and not undergo radioactive decay. It is determined by the ratio of protons to neutrons in the nucleus.

2. How is nuclear stability compared between atoms?

Nuclear stability is compared by calculating the ratio of protons to neutrons in an atom's nucleus, known as the neutron-to-proton ratio. Atoms with a lower neutron-to-proton ratio are considered more stable.

3. What is the role of isotopes in nuclear stability comparison?

Isotopes are atoms of the same element with different numbers of neutrons. Different isotopes of an element can have varying degrees of nuclear stability due to differences in their neutron-to-proton ratio.

4. How does nuclear stability affect an atom's half-life?

An atom with a higher degree of nuclear stability will have a longer half-life, meaning it will take longer for it to decay into a more stable form. Atoms with low nuclear stability have shorter half-lives and are more likely to undergo radioactive decay.

5. How does nuclear stability impact nuclear reactions?

Nuclear stability plays a crucial role in nuclear reactions, as atoms with unstable nuclei are more likely to undergo radioactive decay and release energy. In contrast, atoms with stable nuclei are less likely to undergo reactions and are considered more stable.

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