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Raoult's Law and volume changes

  1. Jun 24, 2013 #1
    When I have a pure liquid in an enclosed container, there is a fixed vapour pressure at a specific temperature. So if i were to increase the volume of the container, more liquid would turn into a vapour to go back to the same vapour pressure as before the expansion occurs.

    However, if i had a mixture of liquids A and B. When I expand it what would happen? now PA =Xx PA° so PA° is fixed but what about the PSUB]A[/SUB] ? Would it stay the same as before? Similarly for PB would it remain the same such that the total vapour pressure remains the same?

    I can't think of a reason why it should or should not remain the same though. For a pure liquid it makes sense that it should stay constant, but when it is a mixture of liquid I'm not too sure if the partial vapour pressure of the 2 liquids would remain the same after expansion. Can someone explain this to me?

    Thanks for the help :)
     
  2. jcsd
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