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Recommend me an introductory physics textbook that is more theoretical?

  1. Oct 6, 2011 #1
    Hi there,

    I've started working through Spivak Calculus, and was wondering if there is an introductory physics textbook that is of similar level of difficulty?

    I have Physics for Scientists and Engineers by Knight but it's a little slow.

    Thanks.
     
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  3. Oct 6, 2011 #2

    atyy

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  4. Oct 7, 2011 #3

    robphy

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    Second vote for Kleppner....
    However, Fetter & Walecka is not an introductory physics text... It's more like a graduate-level text.

    Interesting alternatives to the standard intro texts:

    Moore, http://www.physics.pomona.edu/sixideas/
    https://www.amazon.com/Six-Ideas-That-Shaped-Physics/dp/0072291524

    Chabay & Sherwood, http://matterandinteractions.org/
    https://www.amazon.com/Matter-Interactions-I-Modern-Mechanics/dp/0471354910

    Rex & Jackson, http://www.math.ups.edu/~martinj/calcphys/calcphys.html
    https://www.amazon.com/Integrated-Physics-Calculus-Andrew-Rex/dp/0201473968

    Alonso & Finn,
    https://www.amazon.com/Physics-Marcelo-Alonso/dp/0201565188
     
  5. Oct 7, 2011 #4
    According to the review by Peltio the second editions ('revised' edition) has been watered down from the first, as often happens with great textbooks. I have the first edition of Alonso & Finn and I agree it is a very good book. I have not seen the 2nd edition but I would be surprised if it has indeed been watered down as Peltio says, in which case it is probably like all the other books out there.

    If you can find a cheap copy of the 1st edition I say buy it, otherwise dont bother with this new edition ('revised' as they call it). I see all the 1st edition copies are hideously expensive, so maybe look elsewhere.
     
  6. Oct 8, 2011 #5

    robphy

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    Possibly interesting reading:
    http://www.math.uga.edu/~shifrin/Spivak_physics.pdf [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 5, 2017
  7. Oct 9, 2011 #6
    Last edited by a moderator: May 5, 2017
  8. Oct 9, 2011 #7
    Matter and Motion by James C. Maxwell. This really is one of the best books available. It is is in public domain (obviously) so you can probably download/view it free somewhere. If you prefer print, Dover sells it for like $10.
     
  9. Oct 9, 2011 #8
    Thanks for all the recommendations I will check them out.
     
  10. Oct 10, 2011 #9

    radium

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    For electromagnetism, I recommend Edward Purcell.
     
  11. Oct 10, 2011 #10

    Astronuc

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  12. Oct 11, 2011 #11
    Ya, Landau and Lifgarbagez is a graduate level book, and even they find it difficult! Definitely not for beginners. If you want a graduate level, or advanced undergrad, book try Goldstein. But that's still a bad idea for a beginner.
     
  13. Oct 11, 2011 #12

    robphy

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