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Resistance and temperature.

  1. Apr 27, 2005 #1
    How does the resistance of a non-conductor, eg. a brick change with temperature. Does it conform to the wire where resistance increases with temperature, or is it different?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 27, 2005 #2
    For non conducting materials, resistance would decrease with temperature. Heat is, more or less, agitation of molecules in a substance. If the temperature is great enough, electrons can be ripped from the atoms, thus allowing a current to flow.
     
  4. Apr 27, 2005 #3

    Gokul43201

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    It is very different. A "wire" is usually a conductor, whose resistivity increases with temperature due to increased scattering off the positive ions. A brick is usually an insulator (at room temp) whose resistivity decreases on heating, due to thermal excitations.
    Look at this : https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=72062&highlight=brick
     
  5. Apr 27, 2005 #4
    Thanks guys. Also, would any of you happen to know of a site where I could find the resistances for certain objects?
     
  6. Apr 28, 2005 #5

    Gokul43201

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    1. Google
    2. matweb.com
    3. CRC Handbook of Physics and Chemistry (universities usually have access to an online version)
     
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