Resistor 'absorbs' oscillation?

In summary, the current from the X96010 causes oscillations which are reduced by adding a resistor in series.
  • #1
lennybogzy
94
0
I have a tiny bit of current fluctuation on one of my lines. If i put a lil 500ohm resistor in the line the osillations on the other end substantially decrease.

Why?

Does the resistor effectively 'absorb' these oscillations?
 
Engineering news on Phys.org
  • #2
It is hard to say much without some knowledge of the circuit. If you could tell us more it would help.
 
  • #3
If you are talking about standing waves (oscillations) in transmission lines, then terminate the t-line with its characteristic impedance; e.g., 50 ohms for RG-58. A t-line that is open at one end has a current node (voltage maximum) at the end, and reflects the forward signal..
Bob S.
 
  • #4
Thanks for the replies.

Specifically I'm talking about a X96010 programmable current generator. My suspicion is that the analog temperature driven Vsense for this device is a bit unstable, normally unnoticable, but because there is a high speed LT1394 comparator with a relatively small hysteresis in the design, becomes a problem right around the switch point (otuput oscillates).

Might also have to do with the fact that the X96010 basically acts as an ADC, and I might be flopping between bytes.

Eithe way it is causing some current fluctuation, which seems to be improved if i put an (arbitrary) 499ohm resistor in the line. I'm trying to understand the fundamental reason for the improvement.
 
  • #5
Depending on how long your line is, you could be suffering from oscillation between the source and line. Every line has a capacitance and if you switch a voltage vary quickly into that line, a current spike can be created. What it seems like is happening is that spike is bouncing back and forth between the line and your source; by adding the resistor (in series right?), you are slowing the rate at which the capacitance is charged, reducing the oscillation.
 
  • #6
famousken said:
Depending on how long your line is, you could be suffering from oscillation between the source and line. Every line has a capacitance and if you switch a voltage vary quickly into that line, a current spike can be created. What it seems like is happening is that spike is bouncing back and forth between the line and your source; by adding the resistor (in series right?), you are slowing the rate at which the capacitance is charged, reducing the oscillation.

Yes the resistor is in series. Very interesting, thank you.
 
  • #7
heres the pic, the current from the x96010 is what i believe osillates
 

Attachments

  • ckt.JPG
    ckt.JPG
    15.3 KB · Views: 360
  • #8
If the line from the x96010 is a twisted pair, I would out a ~70 ohm resistor upstream of the 0.1 uF capacitor. This plus the capacitor will be an effective termination for the twisted pair.
Bob S
 

Related to Resistor 'absorbs' oscillation?

What is a resistor?

A resistor is an electrical component that is designed to limit the flow of electric current in a circuit. It is typically made of a material that has a high resistance to electricity, such as carbon or metal.

How does a resistor "absorb" oscillation?

A resistor absorbs oscillation by converting the electrical energy of the oscillation into heat. The resistance of the resistor limits the flow of current, causing the energy to be dissipated in the form of heat.

Why is it important for a resistor to absorb oscillation?

In electronic circuits, oscillation can cause unwanted interference and distortions in the signal. By absorbing the oscillations, the resistor helps to stabilize the circuit and prevent these issues.

What are the types of resistors used for absorbing oscillation?

There are several types of resistors that can be used for absorbing oscillation, including carbon composition resistors, metal film resistors, and wirewound resistors. Each type has different properties that make them suitable for different applications.

Are there any drawbacks to using a resistor for absorbing oscillation?

While resistors are effective at absorbing oscillation, they can also introduce noise into the circuit. This noise can be minimized by choosing the right type of resistor and using proper circuit design techniques.

Similar threads

Replies
80
Views
3K
  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
4
Views
984
  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
1
Views
942
  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Electrical Engineering
Replies
3
Views
1K
Replies
3
Views
1K
Replies
68
Views
4K
  • Electrical Engineering
2
Replies
41
Views
4K
Replies
12
Views
2K
Replies
3
Views
751
Back
Top