Simple Harmonic Motion and pendulum clock

In summary, the question is whether a spring clock or a pendulum clock would be better to take to the moon, and the answer is that the spring clock would be better. This is because the period of a pendulum clock is dependent on gravity, which is different on the moon, while the period of a spring clock is not affected by gravity. Therefore, the spring clock will run at the same rate on the moon as it does on earth.
  • #1
Ogir28
6
0

Homework Statement



What will be better to take to the moon, a spring clock or a pendulum clock. Why?

Homework Equations



F= -k*(Delta)x

k = g m/Dx

T = 2*π*[square-root of:(m/k)]


The Attempt at a Solution



I know that there is less gravitational force while on the moon... Just don't see what the difference would be between block clocks. they both depend on gravity in the same manner...
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
I'm not sure... but doesn't the equation read F=-kx, but k is NOT dependent on g? couldn't the spring be sideways?
 
  • #3
well Usually we've been doing mass spring problems vertically, else, he would have told us... but what would be the factor that would affect a change in k while on the moon?
 
  • #4
the only things that the equation involves are: mass, gravity, k constant
 
  • #5
A pendulum would be better. For a pendulum, period is about 2pi*sqrt(l/g) This is dependent on g, which is different in the moon. It is dependent on g, because g is the restoring force which brings the mass at the end of the string back to equilibrium position. However, for a spring block oscillator, the mass of the object (ideally) doesn't contribute to the restoring force, which is just -k(Dx), and the period is independent of g.

Hope this helped.
 
  • #6
The spring clock would be better because it will run at the same rate on the moon as it does on earth.
 
  • #7
thank you guys very much.
 

1. What is Simple Harmonic Motion?

Simple Harmonic Motion (SHM) is a type of periodic motion in which an object oscillates back and forth around a stable equilibrium position. This motion is characterized by a restoring force that is directly proportional to the displacement of the object from its equilibrium position. Examples of SHM include a mass on a spring, a pendulum, and a vibrating guitar string.

2. How does a pendulum clock work?

A pendulum clock uses the principles of Simple Harmonic Motion to keep time. The pendulum is connected to a mechanism that counts the swings and moves the clock hands accordingly. The length of the pendulum determines the period of the swing, which is used to measure time. The longer the pendulum, the slower the clock will tick.

3. What factors affect the period of a pendulum?

The period of a pendulum is affected by the length of the pendulum, the acceleration due to gravity, and the angle of release. The period is directly proportional to the length of the pendulum and inversely proportional to the square root of the acceleration due to gravity. The angle of release also affects the period, as a larger angle will result in a longer period.

4. Can a pendulum clock lose or gain time?

Yes, a pendulum clock can lose or gain time due to external factors such as changes in temperature and air resistance. These factors can affect the length of the pendulum and its swing, altering the period and causing the clock to run faster or slower than it should. Regular maintenance and adjustments can help keep a pendulum clock accurate.

5. Is Simple Harmonic Motion only observed in pendulums?

No, Simple Harmonic Motion can be observed in various systems and objects. It is a fundamental concept in physics and can be seen in systems such as mass-spring systems, vibrating strings, and even sound waves. The key characteristic of SHM is the presence of a restoring force that is proportional to the displacement, making it a common phenomenon in many physical systems.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
14
Views
481
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
16
Views
399
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
958
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
9
Views
699
  • Classical Physics
Replies
1
Views
610
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
15
Views
4K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • Classical Physics
2
Replies
36
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
846
Back
Top