Simple Pendulum Oscillation: Answers and Explanations for Common Test Questions

In summary, the conversation is about two test questions related to simple pendulum systems. The first question asks about the frequency and amplitude relationship, with the correct answer being that the frequency is independent of amplitude. The second question compares the frequency of two pendulums, with the correct answer being that the length of B is four times the length of A. The conversation also discusses using the formula for the frequency of a physical pendulum to solve the questions.
  • #1
Dx
Hello,

I have two test questions that I missed AT school so i wrote them down. I wanted to know the correct answers as well as a short description of how they came up with that.

1) a simple pendulum consists of a mass attached to a weightless string L. For this system when undergoing small oscillation

a. frequency proportional to amplitude -->that was my original answer
b. period proportional to amplitude
c. frequency independent of mass
frequency is independent of length

My new answer from what I read and understand would be d, am i correct?

2) Simple pendulum A swings back n forth at twice the frequency of a simple pendulum B. what statement is correct?

a. B is twice as long as A
b. B is twice as massive as A
c the length of B is 4 times the length of A
d. the mass of B is 4 times the mass of A

i don't remember but i think the formula is 1/2pi * sqrt(g/L)
anyways can anyone tell me the correct answer and briefly why?

Thanks!
Dx
 
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  • #2
Dx, just look up the formulas for the frequency of a physical pendulum. That tells the whole story for #1. As for #2, you got the formula right, so use it to get the answer.

fA=(1/2π)(g/LA)1/2
fB=(1/2π)(g/LB)1/2

You are told that fA=2fB

Can you take it from there?
 
  • #3
Okay!

Ill take it tom. ill let you know how it went, k
Thanks!
dx :wink:
 

1. What is a simple pendulum and how does it oscillate?

A simple pendulum is a weight suspended from a fixed point that can swing back and forth due to the force of gravity. The oscillation of a simple pendulum is caused by the conservation of energy, with the pendulum constantly switching between kinetic and potential energy as it swings.

2. What factors affect the period of a simple pendulum?

The period of a simple pendulum is affected by the length of the pendulum, the force of gravity, and the amplitude of the swing. The longer the pendulum and the stronger the force of gravity, the longer the period will be. The amplitude of the swing also has an effect, with larger amplitudes resulting in longer periods.

3. How does the mass of the pendulum affect its oscillation?

The mass of the pendulum does not affect the period of its oscillation. This is because the mass cancels out in the equation for the period, leaving only the length and the force of gravity as factors.

4. Can a simple pendulum ever have a period of zero?

No, a simple pendulum cannot have a period of zero. This is because even if the pendulum were released from the same position, it would still have a small amount of energy due to the force of gravity, causing it to oscillate.

5. How is the period of a simple pendulum affected by changing the angle of release?

The angle of release does not affect the period of a simple pendulum. This is because the period is only dependent on the length and force of gravity, not the initial angle at which the pendulum is released.

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