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Aerospace Software for designing parts of a jet

  1. Feb 5, 2010 #1
    Hello,

    I'd like to say hi to everyone since I'm pretty new here, and I guess my first post goes directly to asking a question. Anyway, could someone here recommend me some program for designing parts of a jet or a space vehicle that resembles a delta winged jet. I'm doing this for learning about stuff. Also, I dont need a software which aids me in drawing lines because I could just use paint for that. I'm thinking about something more advanced like integrated simulators for draft resistance, etc.

    I am also very interested in designing engines for jets and rockets, so any kind of software which would help me model them and test them(virtually), would be awesome.

    Thanks,
    Gezim
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 5, 2010 #2
    Hi Gezim,

    I'm sorry to say that it just doesn't work that way. If you are trying to learn about airplanes I would start by going through a few books that explain the basics, like the FAA handbook.

    Doing any kind of design you propose would require an advanced engineering degree.
     
  4. Feb 5, 2010 #3
    Yeah, I am aware of that Cyrus. However, I am going to grab that software and test stuff as I read. You see, alot of people learn by reading or listening or watching videos. I learn by looking at examples or doing the thing I just read. So i am pretty much bound to finding a good software that will draw the part exactly as I specify the parameters, and then if it doesn't have simulators inside, I'll just simply make calculations myself. Anyway, thanks for the handbook recommendation, I'll make sure to check that out.
     
  5. Feb 5, 2010 #4
    As I said earlier, it doesn't work that way. What is your mathematical background?
     
  6. Feb 5, 2010 #5
    Well I am doing Calculus II as part of the standard school curricula, Calculus IV and Applied Calculus as extra curricula. Back at sophomore year in high school I leaped Algebra, Pre-Calculus and Calculus by just doing an exam where I excelled and then I spent the rest of my school year doing advanced mathematics with the guidance of a professor.
     
  7. Feb 5, 2010 #6
    What engineering courses have you taken?
     
  8. Feb 5, 2010 #7

    russ_watters

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    Staff: Mentor

    ....not to mention, any software that even remotely resembles what you are talking about is hugely expensive.
     
  9. Feb 7, 2010 #8
    Are you still in high school?

    If you are interested in jet aeroplanes you should do an Aerospace Engineering course or equivalent at university. Then you should have access to the software you need for designing jet engines/aeroplanes.

    Im currently doing my masters year and my university has such software. The programs I have used are Advanced Aircraft Analysis (AAA), Gambit and Fluent for computational fluid dynamics (CFD), there are a few stress analysis programs such as ANSYS workbench and CAD programs are essential for the geometry and layout which can then be imported into the other programs for further analysis.

    I hope this is information is useful to you.
     
  10. Feb 7, 2010 #9

    FredGarvin

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    There is a software package for designing jet engines? I should tell my management about that. Here we were doing it the old fashioned way by doing some thinking.
     
  11. Feb 7, 2010 #10
    I'm taking a grad level course in propulsion, which covers stuff like parametric cycle analysis and performance analysis of jet engines. We're using a sofware suite from AIAA to do some of the calculations.

    Here's a link:
    http://www.aircraftenginedesign.com/EOP_S.html
     
  12. Feb 8, 2010 #11

    FredGarvin

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    Yeah. I have a copy of that as well. Cycle stuff has tons of different software to do that. When I think of design, I tend to think of the hands on design of the actual components.
     
  13. Feb 8, 2010 #12
    Isn't CFD software used quite a bit in the design of engine components? A professor told me that engine designers perform a full 3D Navier-Stokes analysis of components such as inlets, compressors, etc.
     
  14. Feb 8, 2010 #13

    FredGarvin

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    Of course. CFD is done on all aerodynamic aspects as well as burners. The OP made it sound like they were looking for one catch all software package that will spit out a jet engine design. It also doesn't even begin to cover the notion of knowing what one is putting into a simulation or analysis. I won't go into that rant.
     
  15. Feb 9, 2010 #14

    minger

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    Oh don't get his hopes up. You're telling him that often times useless very pretty pictures can now be multi-phase? haha.
     
  16. Feb 9, 2010 #15
    Hey, you leave colored fluid dynamics alone!
     
  17. Feb 9, 2010 #16

    minger

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    I'm as guilty as anyone. In fact, to usually push it over the top, I'll throw a couple animations over time.

    ...just don't look at the boundaries, just don't look at the boundaries...
     
  18. Feb 9, 2010 #17

    FredGarvin

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    .....and then a miracle happens here.....and then.......

    But the arrows are all you need to look at. Really.
     
  19. Feb 9, 2010 #18
    I was actually hoping that CFD wasn't used very much. My software knowledge is pretty poor for an engineering major...
     
  20. Feb 10, 2010 #19

    minger

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    CFD is used quite extensively. Luckily, as GUIs and interfaces become more user-friendly, less qualified people are actually getting to use the software and design based on it.

    What's a turbulence model?
     
  21. Feb 17, 2010 #20
    Hi gezim,:smile:
    Try Catia V5 or V6 it may be very useful in designing some typical parts
     
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