Tension: 2 wires one at 60degrees one at 45degrees

In summary, the conversation discusses how to solve for tension in a problem involving three wires with different angles and weights. The participants share their methods and equations, but there is some confusion about the given information and the intended meaning of the problem. Ultimately, it is determined that the third wire has a tension and is not connected anywhere.
  • #1
zeshkani1985
15
0
How do you solve for tension, is there a general formula to use

for emample such as this problem(this is not homework, its an example i saw )

you have 2 wires one at 60degrees one at 45degrees both wires have a weight of 5N. find the weight of the third wire that's going down?

how does one approach such a problem

I tired doing this , this way, but i' am wrong since the right answer is 6.1N

1. ||a||5Ncos60=||b||5Ncos45
2. ||a||5sin60+||b||5sin45=c

I substituted equation one into 2 and i got 6.9N
 
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  • #2
Your problem statement is a bit confusing. For example, the reference of the angles is ambiguous. Are the angles measured with respect to the vertical or horizontal?
 
  • #3
Do you mean the wires have a tension of 5N?
 
  • #4
horizontal
 
  • #5
\*****/each wire here has 5N of tension
*\***/
60 \*/45degress
***|
***|
***|
***? what the weight here?
 
  • #6
Your third wire cannot be vertical. All you need to do is find the resultant force from the upper two wires. The force from the third must balance that.
 
  • #7
haruspex said:
Your third wire cannot be vertical.

But if we're talking wires, it pretty much has to be vertical. I think something is missing from the statement of the problem.
 
  • #8
tms said:
But if we're talking wires, it pretty much has to be vertical. I think something is missing from the statement of the problem.
If we're talking hanging weights it has to be vertical, but then the provided information would be inconsistent. I'd say we're just talking tensions, so the wire can be any angle.
 
  • #9
haruspex said:
If we're talking hanging weights it has to be vertical, but then the provided information would be inconsistent. I'd say we're just talking tensions, so the wire can be any angle.

But the third wire is just a hanging weight, according to the information given by the OP. I see what you mean, though, about assuming that the third wire is connected somewhere; the OP could have misunderstood the actual problem, or I could have read too much into the given information.
 
  • #10
tms said:
But the third wire is just a hanging weight, according to the information given by the OP. I see what you mean, though, about assuming that the third wire is connected somewhere; the OP could have misunderstood the actual problem, or I could have read too much into the given information.
All three were described as 'having a weight' (not, e.g., 'having a weight attached'). So I feel the most likely intended meaning is that each has a tension.
 
  • #11
haruspex said:
All three were described as 'having a weight' (not, e.g., 'having a weight attached'). So I feel the most likely intended meaning is that each has a tension.

You're probably right.
 

Related to Tension: 2 wires one at 60degrees one at 45degrees

What is tension?

Tension is a force that is transmitted through a medium, such as a wire, when it is pulled tight from opposite ends.

How is tension calculated?

Tension is calculated by multiplying the force applied to the wire by the distance between the two ends of the wire.

What is the relationship between tension and wire angles?

The tension in a wire is directly proportional to the angle at which the wire is pulled. As the angle increases, so does the tension.

What happens when the two wires have different angles?

The tension in the wire with the smaller angle will be greater than the tension in the wire with the larger angle. This is because the smaller angle creates a more direct pull on the wire, resulting in higher tension.

What are some potential applications of studying tension in wires?

Studying tension in wires can be useful in engineering and construction, as it helps determine the strength and stability of structures. It is also important in understanding the mechanics of materials and can be applied in fields such as physics and biology.

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