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I Using the term "net charge"

  1. Oct 31, 2016 #1
    Hello guy, I have questions with the use of the terms "net charge"
    As far as I know we use net charge when we want to make a sum of positive charge + negative charge

    For example the net charge of Na+ = +11+(-10)= +1
    the net charge of Cl- = _______ = -1

    But can we use the word net charges on subatomic particles such as protons and neutrons and also electrons !?
    A proton has a net charge of 2/3e+ 2/3e- ⅓e= +1e (since it is made of quarks)
    A neutron has a net charge of 0 (the same as a proton but the "sum" is zero)
    An electron (it's not made up of any quarks according to the theory but I assume we can use say +0e - 1e = -1e.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 1, 2016 #2

    Drakkith

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    You can indeed.

    As far as I know you can. I don't think it makes a difference in the end since your final number is the same. 0e + (-1)e = -1e is the same as -1e.
     
  4. Nov 1, 2016 #3

    DrClaude

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    What does the +0e stand for?

    I disagree with @Drakkith, and think that you cannot do that. Why not say then that an electron is +5e -6e = -1e?
     
  5. Nov 1, 2016 #4

    Drakkith

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    I suppose you could if you separated the unit of charge from the object possessing it, but that likely causes problems.
     
  6. Nov 1, 2016 #5
    The main reason is that the proton is made up of quarks and the electron is not. (My opinion)
     
  7. Nov 1, 2016 #6

    jtbell

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    But what does your +0e stand for, with respect to the electron? An electron has no uncharged component.
     
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