Waves Interference and Wavelength Calculations

In summary, the conversation involves three different scenarios involving light and water. The first scenario is a double slit experiment where blue light of wavelength 460nm gives a second order maximum at a certain location on the screen. The question is what wavelength of visible light would have a minimum at the same location. The second scenario is a water tank experiment where water waves are generated with their crests 2.5cm apart and parallel. They pass through two openings 5cm apart in a long wooden board. The question is where would you stand, relative to the "straight through" direction, so that you received little or no wave action. The final scenario involves someone asking for help with setting up an equation for the condition of destructive interference in
  • #1
josephcollins
59
0
Hi ppl, could someone please give me a hand with these:

Light of wavelength 400 nm in air falls on two slits 0.05 mm apart. The slits are immersed in water, as is a viewing screen 40cm away. How far apart are the fringes on the screen?(n water is 1.33)

In a double slit experiment it is found that blue light of wavelength 460nm gives a second order maximum at a certain location on the screen. What wavelength of visible light would have a minimum at the same location?

In a water tank experiment, water waves aee generated with their crests 2.5cm apart and parallel. They pass through two openings 5cm apart in a long wooden board. If the end of the tank is 2m beyond the boards, where would you stand, relative to the "straight through" direction, so that you received little or no wave action?

Thanks for any help,
Joe
 
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  • #2
Is it you don't know how to do this, or is it you just can't be bothered. First show us an attempt at the question, some working out to where you go to, and we'll give you some hints, tips, and bits of information that will help you out
 
  • #3
okay, for the first question, I have managed to work it out myself having calculated the new wavelength.

For the others, it's how to set up an equation bearing in mind the condition for destructive interference that I can't work out.
 

Related to Waves Interference and Wavelength Calculations

1. What are the different types of waves?

There are three main types of waves: mechanical waves, electromagnetic waves, and matter waves. Mechanical waves require a medium to travel through, such as sound waves and water waves. Electromagnetic waves do not require a medium and can travel through a vacuum, such as light and radio waves. Matter waves are associated with the motion of particles, such as electrons.

2. How do waves transfer energy?

Waves transfer energy by vibrating particles in the medium they are traveling through. As the wave passes through the medium, it causes the particles to oscillate, transferring energy from one particle to the next. This is why we can feel the energy of sound waves or the warmth of electromagnetic waves.

3. What is the difference between amplitude and wavelength?

Amplitude is the maximum displacement of a wave from its equilibrium position. It is a measure of the wave's intensity or strength. Wavelength, on the other hand, is the distance between two consecutive points on a wave that have the same phase. It is a measure of the wave's size or length.

4. How are frequency and period related?

Frequency is the number of waves that pass a fixed point in a given amount of time. It is measured in hertz (Hz). Period is the time it takes for one complete wave cycle to pass a fixed point. They are inversely related, meaning as frequency increases, period decreases.

5. What is the speed of a wave?

The speed of a wave is determined by the wave's frequency and wavelength. It is calculated by multiplying the frequency by the wavelength. This relationship is represented by the equation: speed = frequency x wavelength. The speed of a wave is also affected by the properties of the medium it is traveling through.

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