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Why is the transition in resistance gradual at the Critical Temperature

  1. Dec 6, 2015 #1
    Hello. The measurement of electrical resistance as a function of the superconductor's temperature yields fundamental insights into its properties. The Critical Temperature, Critical Current Density, and the Critical Magnetic Field, can all be obtained through variations of a basic experiment.

    I would like to ask you. Why is the transition in resistance gradual at the Critical Temperature (T0) on plot of resistance versus temperature ? ( see the attached picture ). Thank you !!!
     

    Attached Files:

  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 7, 2015 #2
    The different regions in the superconductor aren't reaching critical temp at the same time.
     
  4. Dec 8, 2015 #3
    any help please ?
     
  5. Dec 8, 2015 #4
    Like when you heat mashed potatoes in the microwave. They don't heat evenly right away. The same thing happens when you try to cool objects too.
     
  6. Dec 9, 2015 #5

    f95toli

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    It also has to do with the quality of the superconducting film/material. The Tc of a superconductor depends on how uniform and pure the material is, meaning how steep the transition is will largely depend the quality: a "bad" film will always have a wide transition. This is one reason why the width of the transition is often used as a figure of merit when reporting on the quality of e.g. high-Tc materials.
     
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