Work Input vs Work Output in Pulley Systems

In summary, "work input" in a pulley system is the energy put into the system, while "work output" is the energy produced by the system. They are directly related and must be equal for the system to be in equilibrium. Factors such as the number of pulleys, applied force, and weight of the load affect work input and output. The mechanical advantage of a pulley system can also impact the amount of work needed to produce a certain output. Understanding these concepts is important in fields such as engineering, physics, and construction, where pulley systems are used to lift heavy objects.
  • #1
moomoocow
14
0
hello again,
i know that in an ideal pulley system, work input is equal to work output..however in reality, that is not possible due to friction

but what confuses me is that within what percentage is work input=work output?
how are we supposed to find the percentage?

thank you!
 
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  • #2
In a real pulley, the friction results in a torque that opposes the rotation of the pulley. If you know the torque and the angular displacement you can calculate the work done by friction. The work output is the work input minus the work done by friction.
 
  • #3


Hello there,

You are correct, in an ideal pulley system, the work input is equal to the work output. However, in reality, there are various factors such as friction, air resistance, and energy loss that can affect the efficiency of the pulley system. This means that the work input will always be slightly higher than the work output.

To determine the percentage of efficiency in a pulley system, we can use the formula: Efficiency = (Work Output / Work Input) x 100%. This will give us a percentage that represents the amount of work that is actually being transferred from the input to the output.

For example, if the work input is 100 Joules and the work output is 90 Joules, the efficiency would be (90/100) x 100% = 90%. This means that only 90% of the input work is being transferred to the output, while the remaining 10% is lost due to friction and other factors.

I hope this helps clarify the concept of work input vs work output in pulley systems. Keep in mind that the efficiency percentage will vary depending on the specific conditions and design of the pulley system.
 

Related to Work Input vs Work Output in Pulley Systems

What is "Work Input" and "Work Output" in a pulley system?

In a pulley system, "work input" refers to the amount of energy put into the system by the person or machine operating the pulley, while "work output" refers to the amount of energy produced by the system in moving an object.

How are work input and work output related in a pulley system?

Work input and work output are directly related in a pulley system. This means that the work input must equal the work output in order for the system to be in equilibrium, according to the Law of Conservation of Energy.

What factors affect the work input and work output in a pulley system?

The work input and work output in a pulley system are affected by a few key factors, including the number of pulleys in the system, the force applied to the rope or belt, and the weight of the load being lifted.

How can the mechanical advantage of a pulley system affect work input and work output?

The mechanical advantage of a pulley system, which is the ratio of output force to input force, can affect the work input and work output. A higher mechanical advantage can decrease the amount of work input needed to produce a certain amount of work output.

What are some real-life applications of understanding work input and work output in pulley systems?

Understanding work input and work output in pulley systems is important in many fields, including engineering, physics, and construction. It can be applied to design and optimize pulley systems used in elevators, cranes, and other machinery that involves lifting heavy objects.

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