Yield strength variation with temperature

In summary, the mathematical relationship between yield strength and temperature depends on the type of material.
  • #1
lax
11
0
anyone can help me out by providing the mathematical relationship between yield strength and temperature
 
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  • #2
hi lax ... what material is in question? With respect to room temperature, 'upwards' or 'downwards'?
 
  • #3
Yield strength decreases with increasing temperature, but the relationship depends on the type of material.
 
  • #4
I have a few great diagrams on that topic in my strength of materials book, too bad I don't have a scanner.
 
  • #5
If you tell us what materials, I am sure one of us would be able to reference a source for what you need.
 
  • #6
Dear all ,
Thank You 4 replying me.
Actually I need Yield Strength Temperature Correction factor in my Calculations for following materials (Alloys of Stell) at various temperatures ranging from 200 Degree Fahrenheit to 800 Degree Farenheit:
1. 9CR-1MO (Chromium- 8-10%)
2. 410-13CR (Chromium- 12.5-13.5%)
3. 925 INCOLOY (Nickel- 42-46%)
4. 718 INCONEL (Nickel- 50-55%)
I mentioned major alloying Element in each alloy.
If You need more information about these alloys , Pl. let me know.
I'll be very greatful if any of you solve my problem.
 
  • #7
The other part of the problem is the residual cold work. Are the materials in question fully annealed or cold-worked, which affects in the initial YS?
 
  • #8
Inco 718 (page 1):
http://www.specialmetals.com/documents/Inconel%20alloy%20718.pdf

Inco 925 (page 1):
http://www.specialmetals.com/documents/Incoloy%20alloy%20925.pdf

I'm still trying to find something on line for the other two.
 
  • #9
Thank You Fredgarvin for providing the links.
For Incoloy 925, We are able to find the variation of YS with temperature in the form of a curve in the given link.
I know that the variation is non-linear.But Cannot we find out the mathematical Relation for that, which'll be very much helpful to me.
Dear Austronac,
why don't You provide the information I asked for annealed as well as cold worked
 
  • #10
Do you have access to a program like Excel? Simply plot the points and curve fit them to get the relationship.
 
  • #11
FredGarvin,

What you told is correct but the problem is you need to select the option in which manner (Exponential,logarthmic, polynomial,etc) the variation would be while doing it in Excel.
I feel it would be correct if we know the relationship b/w Yield Strength and temperature.
As per my observation it may be dependent on Youngs Modulus and Poisson's ratio also.Iam not sure of that.Could you please think over it once again?
 
  • #12
Dear all,
I got Some info reg. factors affecting yield stress.
There I found 2 eq.in which how Yield stress is affected by temperature is given.But problem is most of the terms in those eq. are constants, which Iam unable to understand.

You can find this info on
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yield_(engineering)

Pl. go through it n let me know if you understand it.
 

Related to Yield strength variation with temperature

1. What is yield strength variation with temperature?

Yield strength variation with temperature refers to the change in the amount of stress a material can withstand before it permanently deforms. This change is due to the temperature of the material, with higher temperatures typically resulting in a decrease in yield strength.

2. Why does yield strength vary with temperature?

The variation in yield strength with temperature is mainly due to the changes in the material's microstructure. As temperature increases, the movement of atoms and defects within the material increases, leading to a decrease in strength. Additionally, some materials can undergo phase transitions at certain temperatures, further affecting their yield strength.

3. How does yield strength variation with temperature affect material performance?

The variation in yield strength with temperature can significantly impact the performance of a material. For example, in structural applications, a decrease in yield strength with temperature can lead to failure under high temperature conditions. It can also affect the fatigue life and durability of a material.

4. How is yield strength variation with temperature measured?

Yield strength variation with temperature is typically measured through tensile testing. This involves subjecting a material to a gradually increasing load while recording the resulting strain. The point at which the material begins to deform permanently is known as the yield strength, and this can be measured at different temperatures to determine how it varies.

5. Can yield strength variation with temperature be controlled?

Yes, yield strength variation with temperature can be controlled through various methods such as alloying, heat treatment, and cold working. By altering the material's microstructure, it is possible to adjust its yield strength at different temperatures to meet specific performance requirements.

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