Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Aerospace Aircraft maintenance engineering

  1. Dec 16, 2009 #1
    i am doing aircraft maintenance engineering, after completing it can i go to the m.s aerospace engineering for my further studies...... please reply
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 16, 2009 #2
    unfortunately nope.

    you need to have degree in aerospace/aeronautical engineering.
     
  4. Dec 16, 2009 #3
    You don't necessarily need an engineering degree, but you will need a four-year Bachelor's degree, preferably with a strong math/physics background.
     
  5. Dec 17, 2009 #4
    Fortunately, yep - Brian C is correct.
     
  6. Dec 17, 2009 #5

    FredGarvin

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    If you don't have an engineering degree and you get accepted, you will have a lot of ground to make up. I can tell you from experience you do not want to walk into a graduate level class with no undergraduate experience.
     
  7. Dec 17, 2009 #6
    He's not walking into a graduate level class with "no undergraduate experience." He's getting a 4-year degree in "aircraft maintenance engineering."

    Whatever that is, no graduate school in the US would accept him if it werent' a four-year degree. I suspect it entails more hands-on shop and ME work, possibly IEOR work, but regardless, it'll give him some background.

    The rest is up to the GRE's, and his graduate school course advisors, who will require him to take whatever pre-req's are required to bring him up to speed before he's allowed to wade in more substantial stuff.
     
  8. Dec 17, 2009 #7
    anvesh your name sounds like indian.

    so if your query is related to post graduation studies in india,

    then no buddy, in india you need to have mechanical/aeronautical/aerospace/chemical/electronics/electrical engineering degree depending on the specialization of your masters.

    like if you want aerodynamics as your specialization then you should have a mech/aeronautcis/aerospace degree.

    if you want propulsion as your specialization then you need to have mech/aero/chemical engineering degree.

    structures - then degree in mech/civil/aero.


    in india, with AME degree you cant do masters in aerospace/aeronautics.

    abroad ---> like they have mentioned above. it depends.

    i hope you got my point.


    good luck
     
  9. Dec 17, 2009 #8

    FredGarvin

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    No. By background, I mean an engineering background. He is thinking of walking into a very intensive engineering program with, most likely, very lacking engineering technical skills. For example, if he has never taken a real, engineering fluids class as an undergrad, you do not want to try to learn fluids in a graduate level class. His experience in "aircraft maintenance" has, most likely, zero exposure to a real engineering fluids class or compressible flow, or aerodynamics, or thermo...
     
  10. Dec 17, 2009 #9
    thanx .....actually i'm doing my aircraft.m. engineering in perth college in u.k ,scotland,and i'm going to complete honors in aircraft engineering also,...yes i'm from india....i like to do m.s aerospace engineering...please let me know or give any suggestion
     
  11. Dec 17, 2009 #10
    thanx .....actually i'm doing my aircraft.m. engineering in perth college in u.k ,scotland,and i'm going to complete honors in aircraft engineering also,...yes i'm from india....i like to do m.s aerospace engineering...please let me know or give any suggestion
     
  12. Dec 17, 2009 #11

    FredGarvin

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    Out of curiosity, can you post a link to your curriculum? I'd be interested to see what classes make up the degree program.
     
  13. Dec 17, 2009 #12
    I understand your point, Fred. I suppose we'd need to know more of what "aircraft maintenance engineering" entails. That's best left up to the admissions, who will require a copy of his school's catalog and his transcripts.

    On the face of it, it sounds a little weak, but I don't want to throw cold water on someone's dream when I don't know what the "engineering" part of his AM degree entails. I certainly will not assume it's meaninless as an engineering background, because it might very well have checked the right boxes.

    Without further information about the "engineering aspect," guessing, assuming, and telling him "it's not good enough" is premature.
     
  14. Dec 17, 2009 #13
    That's definitely true. I had to take undergrad classes in aerodynamics, flight dynamics, and structural statics before attempting any graduate classes in AE. The learning curve was very steep.
     
  15. Dec 17, 2009 #14
    An Aircraft Maintenance Engineer (AME) is a person licenced to ensure that aircraft are airworthy in accordance with local and international aviation standards.It is an ICAO licience, somewhat smilar to the A&P (AMT), although the latter is not an ICAO licience. Many countries use AME’s in different forms.
    It is not an engineering degree, but he would know something about airplanes.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aircraft_Maintenance_Engineer
    http://www.caa.co.uk/docs/33/ELGDBook_07_WebVersion.pdf
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook