Anyone good with organic chem reactions? I find this one really interesting

In summary, the conversation discusses the formation of an ester, specifically 2-propanol acetate, with a molar mass of 132g/mol and a density of 0.87g/ml. It is mentioned that sulfuric acid is needed as a catalyst for the esterification process, which is in equilibrium with the reverse reaction of ester hydrolysis. The use of Le Chatelier's principle to push the equilibrium towards products is also suggested. Concerns about the boiling point of isopropanol and the potential formation of an azeotrope when heating the system to 100 C are also mentioned.
  • #1
Bcs
3
0
TL;DR Summary
If 100ml of heated acetic acid was mixed with 1L of heated 2-propanol, let’s say 75-100C. Will 2-propanol acetate form? If so, how much? And with no addition of a strong acid like sulfuric acid or the high temperature, variables typically applied during esterification reactions. Answers don’t have to be exact. Interesting to see why ppl seem to get quite dissimilar answers though.
132g/ml
870g/mol
2-propanol acetate
 
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  • #2
Correction:
102g/mol
Density .87g/ml
 
  • #3
As a first guess, maybe an ester, like you did,
but if you want an expert, then someone else should also respond.
 
  • #4
Formation of the ester will be very slow without a catalyst (which is what sulfuric acid is). Also, esterification is in equilibrium with the reverse reaction (ester hydrolysis to alcohol/carboxylic acid), and I don't know off the top of my head where that equilibrium sits for isopropanol and acetic acid. Typically when you do an esterification in the lab, you use Le Chatelier's principle to push the equilibrium toward products (either by adding one reagent in excess or by removing the water generated by the condensation reaction).
 
  • #5
Also, isopropanol boils at around 80 C. I don't know whether the mixture of isopropyl and acetic acid forms an azeotrope. This will be an issue if you're heating the system up to 100 C.
 

Related to Anyone good with organic chem reactions? I find this one really interesting

1. What are the most common types of organic chem reactions?

The most common types of organic chem reactions are substitution, addition, elimination, and rearrangement reactions. These reactions involve the breaking and formation of covalent bonds between carbon atoms in organic molecules.

2. How do I know which reagents to use for a specific organic chem reaction?

The choice of reagents for a specific organic chem reaction depends on the reactants involved and the desired products. It is important to understand the functional groups present in the reactants and how they will interact with the reagents. Consulting a reaction database or a textbook can help in selecting the appropriate reagents.

3. What is the role of a catalyst in organic chem reactions?

A catalyst is a substance that speeds up a chemical reaction without being consumed in the process. In organic chem reactions, a catalyst lowers the activation energy required for the reaction to occur, making it faster and more efficient. It does this by providing an alternative reaction pathway with a lower activation energy.

4. How can I predict the products of an organic chem reaction?

Predicting the products of an organic chem reaction involves understanding the functional groups present in the reactants and how they will interact with each other. It also requires knowledge of reaction mechanisms and the types of bonds that will be formed or broken during the reaction. Practice and familiarity with common reaction patterns can also aid in predicting products.

5. What are some common mistakes to avoid in organic chem reactions?

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