Applying a Bending Moment to a Plate with Forces

In summary, the conversation discusses using FEA to simulate an in-plane bending moment on a plate with specific measurements. The question is whether to simulate the forces on the edge in situation (a) or (b). The person is seeking a clear answer and mentions that the stress distribution of a moment is greater as you move away from the central axis, and is 0 at the central axis.
  • #1
SublimeTouch
1
0
I'm using FEA to simulate an in plane bending moment on a plate.

The moment is 200Nm, and the plate is 80mm tall.

Do I simulate the forces on the edge in situation (a) or situation (b)? It's a seemingly simple question, but people have put doubt in my head, I hoped a fresh mind might help. The length of the arrows represents magnitude, the arrow head represents direction. Shown is the right edge of the plate... That should cover everything.

(a)
|---->
|--->
|-->
|->
|<-
|<--
|<---
|<----

(b)
|->
|-->
|--->
|---->
|<----
|<---
|<--
|<-

A swift answer would be massively appreciated. My brain is frazzled right now.
 
Engineering news on Phys.org
  • #2
The first one is the stress distribution of a moment, assuming the directions are correct.
Basically, the stress is greater as you move away from the central axis, and is 0 at the central axis (assuming pure moment).
 
  • #3


As a fellow scientist, I understand your need for a clear and definitive answer. In this situation, it is important to consider the direction of the applied moment and the orientation of the plate. If the moment is applied in the same direction as the arrows in situation (a), then this would be the correct representation. However, if the moment is applied in the opposite direction, then situation (b) would be the appropriate choice. It is also important to consider the orientation of the plate, as the forces should be applied perpendicular to the plate's surface. I would recommend double checking your inputs and assumptions to ensure an accurate simulation. Additionally, consulting with a colleague or expert in finite element analysis (FEA) could provide valuable insight and help clarify any doubts. Good luck with your simulation!
 

Related to Applying a Bending Moment to a Plate with Forces

1. What is a bending moment?

A bending moment is a measure of the bending or twisting force applied to an object, such as a plate, that can cause it to deform or break. It is typically measured in units of force multiplied by distance, such as Newton-meters (Nm) or pound-feet (lb-ft).

2. How is a bending moment applied to a plate?

A bending moment is applied to a plate by placing a force on one or more points along the edge or surface of the plate. The force can be applied directly or through a lever, and its direction and magnitude will determine the resulting bending moment on the plate.

3. What factors affect the bending moment on a plate?

The amount and distribution of force applied, the shape and size of the plate, and the properties of the material used all affect the bending moment on a plate. Other factors such as temperature, humidity, and external supports or constraints can also play a role.

4. How does a bending moment affect the strength of a plate?

A bending moment can cause a plate to bend or deform, and if the force is strong enough, it can exceed the plate's elastic limit and lead to permanent deformation or failure. The magnitude of the bending moment and the plate's resistance to bending, known as its bending stiffness, determine its strength.

5. What is the importance of understanding bending moments in plate analysis?

Understanding bending moments is crucial for accurate analysis and design of plates in various applications, such as structural engineering, aerospace engineering, and material testing. It allows for predicting and optimizing the behavior and performance of plates under different loading conditions, and can help prevent failures and ensure the safety and reliability of structures and products.

Similar threads

Replies
3
Views
713
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
11
Views
2K
  • Mechanical Engineering
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Mechanical Engineering
Replies
3
Views
2K
Replies
11
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
1K
  • Mechanical Engineering
Replies
11
Views
2K
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
2
Replies
48
Views
6K
Replies
10
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
31
Views
3K
Back
Top