Do you suffer from an affective disorder?

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What mental affective disorder do you have? (or did you have once)

  • Psychosis, schizophrenia

    Votes: 3 3.4%
  • Eating disorder

    Votes: 4 4.6%
  • Anxiety disorder

    Votes: 28 32.2%
  • Depression

    Votes: 31 35.6%
  • Bipolar disorder or other mood disorder

    Votes: 9 10.3%
  • Autism spectrum disorder (aspergers)

    Votes: 8 9.2%
  • Personality disorder

    Votes: 9 10.3%
  • OCD

    Votes: 17 19.5%
  • Other

    Votes: 8 9.2%
  • none

    Votes: 28 32.2%
  • PTSD

    Votes: 4 4.6%

  • Total voters
    87
  • #176
39
0


yeah.. I definitely get a touch of that. Nothing disabling, but definitely I just want to go somewhere, and take a nap... or turn bright lights on. This is a problem because my spouse likes it dim.

Come to think of it, he also has poor hearing (like all spouses). That might be a bad thing regarding my misophonia... which also seems to be partly a result of very good hearing.
That's called selective hearing. A friend of mines dad went to the Dr who referred him to a hearing specialist and he said his years of working in high noise environments have probably damaged the range of hearing around the high pitched voice area. He said you're going to have to write that down as my wife is never going to believe it!
 
  • #177
cobalt124
Gold Member
50
32


That's called selective hearing!
I thought selective hearing was a "teenager affliction"!
 
  • #178
cobalt124
Gold Member
50
32


Reading this thread I seem to have some symptoms of all the (OCD, autism, aspbergers) disorders mentioned. I don't seem to be able to pick out individual behaviours as such, its like my everyday life growing up was (and is) ritualised and repetitive, so maybe I have "nurturally inherited" OCD/autism from my parents. Dunno. I also seem to be playing down my problems to a degree, which is what my family has been telling me and I didn't believe them. I wasn't completely happy with my diagnosis of OCD, as I was told I had the obsessive part, but not the compulsive part, and I felt I was being "fobbed off" with a false diagnosis. I was in no state to question my diagnosis in detail. I've just read about "Purely Obsessional OCD", and that seems to give a very accurate description of what I've been going through, so I'm going to look into that a bit more (the Wiki looks like it needs some work).

I've suspected since I was a teenager that I (and my Dad) have (had) some sort of autism and this used to be an issue. Now I would just like to know where I lie on the spectrum, curiousity more than anything.
 
  • #179
131
1


This seems like a fairly old thread but I guess it's better to post it here.

As silly as it seems, I just want to know what it's like to try treatment from a professional, or to confide yourself to a therapist, or to a psychiatrist? I have never been diagnosed but now I'm fairly certain I have some problems in my head that I probably had for a couple of years already.

I've always thought it's too much of a drag and the only reason I consider doing so is that maybe I'd get prescriptions for medicines. The thought of being counseled by a therapist is too irking to me though.
 
  • #180
3,077
4


In the U.S.,

A psychiatrist is a medical doctor (M.D.) who can diagnose and prescribe medicines, but nowadays usually does not provide counsel.

A psychologist is a Ph.D. who can diagnose and counsel (like with the popular cognitive behavioral therapy).

Other professionals for counseling include a psychiatric nurse and a psychiatric social worker.

A family doctor or sometimes a nurse practitioner can prescribe medications for mental illness.
 
  • #181
davenn
Science Advisor
Gold Member
9,408
8,290


I thought selective hearing was a "teenager affliction"!
naaaa it also applies to husbands of all ages when they really dont wanna get involved with the wife's "honey do list" :tongue:

Dave
 
  • #182
6,265
1,280


This seems like a fairly old thread but I guess it's better to post it here.

As silly as it seems, I just want to know what it's like to try treatment from a professional, or to confide yourself to a therapist, or to a psychiatrist? I have never been diagnosed but now I'm fairly certain I have some problems in my head that I probably had for a couple of years already.

I've always thought it's too much of a drag and the only reason I consider doing so is that maybe I'd get prescriptions for medicines. The thought of being counseled by a therapist is too irking to me though.
As Loren says, you can get meds alone without any counseling. In fact, a psychiatrist will not even offer counselling. He or she will just ask a bunch of questions to arrive at an idea of what meds to try, and on follow up visits will ask what effect they had on your symptoms and about side effects you may have had. Talk therapy is a completely separate consideration that you have to set up with a different specialist if you want to try that. There are also group therapy sessions sometimes available they may or may not recommend.
 
  • #183
SpringCreek


As has already been said, any family doctor can and will prescribe meds, usually for depression. But if you are serious about your treatment you might as well go to a specialist like a psychiatrist.

Don't be surprised if the psychiatrist suggests that you see a psychologist as well. They sometimes work in conjunction. In my case, I went to a psychologist first. After a thorough evaluation (eight hours of testing over two days), I was sent to a psychiatrist for a prescription and then began talk therapy with the psychologist. I never went back to the psychiatrist but I was treated by the psychologist for a few years.

You asked what it's like to confide yourself to a professional: At times it's scary, uncomfortable, maddening and embarrassing. At other times it's soothing, reassuring, encouraging and even thrilling (as in "Eureka!").

It takes courage and an open mind, but this is your life we're talking about. As I see it, any amount of effort expended in the pursuit of a good quality of life is worth it.
 
  • #184
Evo
Mentor
23,174
2,918


As Loren says, you can get meds alone without any counseling. In fact, a psychiatrist will not even offer counselling. He or she will just ask a bunch of questions to arrive at an idea of what meds to try, and on follow up visits will ask what effect they had on your symptoms and about side effects you may have had. Talk therapy is a completely separate consideration that you have to set up with a different specialist if you want to try that. There are also group therapy sessions sometimes available they may or may not recommend.
Actually there are psychiatrists that do individual counseling in addition to managing medicine. I would recommened a psychiatrist that does counseling over a psychologist, as psychiatrists have medical backgrounds and you have only one person to deal with. You may have to do some searching but it will be worth it, IMO.
 
  • #185
6,265
1,280


Actually there are psychiatrists that do individual counseling in addition to managing medicine. I would recommened a psychiatrist that does counseling over a psychologist, as psychiatrists have medical backgrounds and you have only one person to deal with. You may have to do some searching but it will be worth it, IMO.
I had completely forgot there are psychiatrists with their own private practice who might also do counseling. I've usually gone to clinic shrinks, and the clinic will have a separate therapist.
 
  • #186
1,352
90


As has already been said, any family doctor can and will prescribe meds, usually for depression. But if you are serious about your treatment you might as well go to a specialist like a psychiatrist.
I think it's crazy that the two are not mutually inclusive. Is it not that the purpose of the meds to "balance" the emotive side preparing the patient for the psychiatric treatment?
 
  • #187
Evo
Mentor
23,174
2,918


I think it's crazy that the two are not mutually inclusive. Is it not that the purpose of the meds to "balance" the emotive side preparing the patient for the psychiatric treatment?
If it's just a problem than can be treated with meds, meds are all you need.
 
  • #188
SpringCreek


I think it's crazy that the two are not mutually inclusive. Is it not that the purpose of the meds to "balance" the emotive side preparing the patient for the psychiatric treatment?
Sort of. The meds are the psychiatric treatment. But sometimes they can be helpful in facilitating pyschotherapy, such as by balancing/stabilizing the patient and thereby stopping a downward spiral before things get tragic. Kind of like 'buying time' to give therapy a chance to work.

Also, sometimes meds can help a patient to open up more in therapy and to talk more freely. As the saying goes, progress in therapy is only being made when the patient is talking.

As Evo said, it might be that meds alone are sufficient. I would add that in other cases psychotherapy alone is sufficient. This is why it's so important to be properly evaluated by a specialist.
 
  • #189
1,352
90


Ah i see, makes sense, thanks for the replies :smile:
 
  • #190
3,077
4


Talk therapy and medication can be twice as effective as either one alone.
 
  • #191
Evo
Mentor
23,174
2,918


Talk therapy and medication can be twice as effective as either one alone.
It really depends. I have panic attacks. There are no triggers. I might be watching someone making a sandwich, I might be painting my toenails, I might be having a pleasant dream then WHAM, panic attack. That is why I have ativan.
 
  • #192
cobalt124
Gold Member
50
32


Talk therapy and medication can be twice as effective as either one alone.
(U.K.) - Other than the "twice" part it is my experience that both are needed. Talk alone never helped, and I refused medication alone. Saying that it all depends on other factors like therapist client relationship, and a willingness by the client to want to sort out the problem. From what I have read, which isn't much admittedly, both is seen as the best approach.
 

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