Exploring the Acceleration of a Projectile Motion Lab

In summary, the homework statement asks if the acceleration found through Vy vs. t graph should always be equal to -9.8 m/s^2. The answer is no, as the object was launched at an angle.
  • #1
devilish_wit
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Homework Statement


We had a lab on projectile motion and one of the questions was this:

Use your Vy versus t graph to determine the y-component of the acceleration of the puck. Should this be equal to the acceleration due to gravity (9.8 m/s)? Explain why it is or why it is not.

The acceleration we got from the Vy vs time graph is -1.90m/s^2. Should that have been the same with -9.8 m/s^2? Also just take note that the object was launched at a certain angle.

Homework Equations

The Attempt at a Solution



My answer is no because the platform at which the object was thrown was launched at an angle (?) I really can't explain it.
 
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  • #2
devilish_wit said:
Should that have been the same with -9.8 m/s^2?
You don't give much detail of the experiment, but it sounds like it should have been much closer to g.
Please give a clear description of the set up and post the data you collected in a form that can be cut and pasted.
 
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  • #3
devilish_wit said:

Homework Statement


We had a lab on projectile motion and one of the questions was this:

Use your Vy versus t graph to determine the y-component of the acceleration of the puck. Should this be equal to the acceleration due to gravity (9.8 m/s)? Explain why it is or why it is not.

The acceleration we got from the Vy vs time graph is -1.90m/s^2. Should that have been the same with -9.8 m/s^2? Also just take note that the object was launched at a certain angle.

Homework Equations

The Attempt at a Solution



My answer is no because the platform at which the object was thrown was launched at an angle (?) I really can't explain it.

As has been stated, no one could, or should, be able to answer this without you describing explicitly the nature of your experiment. After all, this "projectile" could have been launched on a slanted surface, etc... (since it was called a "puck").

Zz.
 
  • #4
Poster has been reminded not to create multiple threads about the same question
Should the acceleration found through Vy vs. t graph be always equal to -9.8 m/s^2?

Does the angle of launch affect gravity?
 
  • #5
What do you think and why?

And are you aware of the mathematical concepts of vectors and the horizontal and vertical components of a vector?
 
  • #6
I guess the acceleration from Vy vs t should equal to 9.8 m/s^2, while the one you find from Vx vs t is 0m/s^2. So when you take those values and solve “a = square root of x^2 + y^2” it would equal to the gravitational acceleration 9.8 m/s^2.

I mean I’m not the best in physics that’s why I’m here to ask questions that need clarification.
 
  • #7
Thread closed temporarily for Moderation...
 
  • #8
Thread re-opened after a 2nd thread on the same question was merged into this original thread.
 
  • #9
devilish_wit said:
I guess the acceleration from Vy vs t should equal to 9.8 m/s^2, while the one you find from Vx vs t is 0m/s^2. So when you take those values and solve “a = square root of x^2 + y^2” it would equal to the gravitational acceleration 9.8 m/s^2.

I mean I’m not the best in physics that’s why I’m here to ask questions that need clarification.
Please respond to post #2.
 
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Related to Exploring the Acceleration of a Projectile Motion Lab

1. What is projectile motion?

Projectile motion is the motion of an object through the air or space under the influence of gravity. It is a type of motion that follows a curved path. Examples of projectile motion include a ball thrown in the air, a bullet fired from a gun, or a rocket launched into space.

2. What is the purpose of exploring the acceleration of a projectile motion lab?

The purpose of this lab is to understand the concept of acceleration and how it affects the motion of a projectile. By exploring the acceleration of a projectile motion, we can learn about the relationship between force, acceleration, and motion, as well as the effects of gravity on the trajectory of a projectile.

3. How is the acceleration of a projectile calculated?

The acceleration of a projectile can be calculated using the formula a = (vf - vi) / t, where a is the acceleration, vf is the final velocity, vi is the initial velocity, and t is the time it takes for the projectile to travel from its initial position to its final position.

4. What factors affect the acceleration of a projectile?

The acceleration of a projectile is affected by several factors, including the initial velocity, the angle of launch, the mass of the object, and air resistance. Gravity is the main force that affects the acceleration of a projectile, causing it to accelerate towards the ground at a constant rate of 9.8 m/s^2.

5. How can the data collected from this lab be applied in the real world?

The data collected from this lab can be applied in various real-world scenarios. For example, understanding the acceleration of a projectile can help in designing and launching rockets, predicting the trajectory of a ball in sports, or calculating the distance and time of a bullet fired from a gun. It can also help in understanding the effects of gravity and air resistance on the motion of objects in the atmosphere and in space.

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