Exploring the Period of Oscillations: A Quiz Question

In summary, the conversation is about finding the period T of a sinusoidal waveform using the given coordinates of points R and K. The formula for calculating period T is T = 1/f, where f is the frequency. The attempt at a solution involved using the given coordinates to calculate velocity and then assuming that the period would be 2T. However, the correct method is to divide the given time difference by 4 to get the total period. The period in this case is .02 seconds.
  • #1
whitetiger
22
0

Homework Statement



Now assume that the x coordinate of point R is 0.12m and the t coordinate of point K is 0.0050 s.

What is the period T ?

Homework Equations



T = 1/f where f is the frequency and T is the period.

The Attempt at a Solution



From the graph, there are 2 periods in oscillation. So I guess that the period would be 2T and since it starts at R = .12m and reaches point K in .0050 s . So the velocity is .12m/.0050 s = 24m/s

Not sure if this is correct but, T = 2T = .12m/.005s = T = 12 s
 

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  • #2
No. The horizontal distance from 0 to K is a quarter of the period of that sinusoidal waveform. Since you are given the time difference from 0 to K, and that is a quarter of the period, what is the total period?
 
  • #3
berkeman said:
No. The horizontal distance from 0 to K is a quarter of the period of that sinusoidal waveform. Since you are given the time difference from 0 to K, and that is a quarter of the period, what is the total period?

Thank for the help

From what you have said, I can calculate the total period to be (.005)4 = .02s
 
  • #4
Good. Quiz Question -- what is special about that period?
 

1. What are oscillations?

Oscillations refer to the repetitive back-and-forth motion of a system or object around an equilibrium point. This can occur in various forms, such as a pendulum swinging back and forth or a spring vibrating up and down.

2. How are oscillations measured?

Oscillations can be measured by recording the period, frequency, and amplitude of the motion. The period is the time it takes for one complete cycle, the frequency is the number of cycles per unit of time, and the amplitude is the maximum displacement from the equilibrium point.

3. What is the difference between simple harmonic motion and damped harmonic motion?

Simple harmonic motion is a type of oscillation where the restoring force is directly proportional to the displacement from the equilibrium point and acts in the opposite direction. Damped harmonic motion, on the other hand, involves a damping force that decreases the amplitude of the oscillation over time.

4. How do oscillations relate to wave motion?

Oscillations and wave motion are closely related, as waves can be described as the propagation of oscillations through a medium. The amplitude and frequency of the oscillations determine the characteristics of the resulting wave, such as its height and wavelength.

5. What are some real-life applications of oscillations?

Oscillations have many practical applications, such as in timekeeping devices like pendulum clocks and in musical instruments. They are also important in fields such as engineering, where oscillations are used to design structures that can withstand vibrations and earthquakes.

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