How are the connectors on the DC linear actuator utilized in wiring?

In summary: Installing_a_Pingel_Electric_Speed_Shifter.pdfI did find this pdf for installing pingel's kit, I'm not sure if it is any more help you you...
  • #1
Ramok
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A am working on a project that uses this 12V DC linear actuator. The actuator utilizes a magnetic coil and plunger inner design (I believe this is just a solenoid). This actuator will need to use both directions of movement for the project. In terms of wiring, what do the two female connectors do as well as the male connector?

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  • #2
Use a multimeter and measure between the male socket pin and the housing. It seems very likely that the pin is a (safety) ground connector. The two female sockets are probably the drive inputs - my guess is +12V applied one way drives the actuator out and +12V applied the other way drives the actuator in. But - those are just my guesses!
 
  • #3
Can you see a part number on it?
 
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  • #4
Welcome to PF.

Ramok said:
This actuator will need to use both directions of movement
A solenoid like that is generally only attractive, not repulsive. The higher B-field concentration inside the coil pulls the metal shaft into its interior. In order to get a push-pull action, you would need to use a return spring for the push action, or use another coil that would pull the main metal part of the plunger back into it. Are you sure that solenoid you show is supposed to be capable of the "push" motion? Can you link to its datasheet or provide a manufacturer part number?
 
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  • #5
Like this
 

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  • #6
DaveE said:
Can you see a part number on it?
I cannot see a part number
 
  • #7
berkeman said:
Welcome to PF.A solenoid like that is generally only attractive, not repulsive. The higher B-field concentration inside the coil pulls the metal shaft into its interior. In order to get a push-pull action, you would need to use a return spring for the push action, or use another coil that would pull the main metal part of the plunger back into it. Are you sure that solenoid you show is supposed to be capable of the "push" motion? Can you link to its datasheet or provide a manufacturer part number?
This solenoid is meant to shift a motorcycle transition up and down, so I believe it should have both directions.
 
  • #8
When it's disconnected, can you easily slide it into any position, or is there some spring tension holding it at one extreme?
 
  • #9
If you really have no data then you should measure the forward and backward resistance between the three terminals. Make a table and report back...
 
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  • #10
Ramok said:
This solenoid is meant to shift a motorcycle transition up and down, so I believe it should have both directions.
Please provide links to the supplier and the product.
 
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  • #11
DaveE said:
When it's disconnected, can you easily slide it into any position, or is there some spring tension holding it at one extreme?
With no power it slides freely without tension.
 
  • #15
berkeman said:
Hmm, yeah, that's very little help. Do you have one? Is there a marking on it for the model number or manufacturer?
I have one and looked all over it. No markings or except for the Pingel logo. I know its not helpful, which is mostly why I posted here maybe someone had more knowledge about this style of solenoid than I do.
 
  • #16
Ramok said:
I have one and looked all over it. No markings or except for the Pingel logo. I know its not helpful, which is mostly why I posted here maybe someone had more knowledge about this style of solenoid than I do.
Do you have a 12V bench power supply? If so, maybe try driving 12V through the two female connectors both ways to see if that fires the solenoid in the push and pull directions. If it doesn't we'll need to figure something else out. BTW, what is the resistance you measure in each of the two directions between the two female input connectors?
 
  • #17
At the moment I don't have access to that power supply or even a multimeter. I will hopefully be able to go test the suggestions you have given me later tonight or tomorrow.

I did find this pdf for installing pingel's kit, I'm not sure if it is any more help you you tho.
https://www.physicsforums.com/file:///C%3A/Users/Rayce/Downloads/Universal%204-Coil%2077401%20&%2077402%20rev06102014%20(1).pdf
 

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  • #18
The Pingel linear actuator may have two internal solenoids, but with one armature. One solenoid coil would be used to kick up, the other to kick down. Three wires are sufficient to control the two solenoid coils. Maybe there is a centre return spring.

A linear actuator, employing a ball screw, would normally have an external motor. It would also need to return to the mid-position after operation.
 
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  • #19
There is a phone number for Pingel on the PDF. Have you tried them?
This solenoid must have multiple coils internally but there are a number of ways one could do this.
 
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