How High Will Water Shoot from a Broken Vertical Pipe?

In summary, the conversation involves determining the gauge pressure of water fed from a tank to the bottom of a hill by a diagonally positioned pipe. The question then shifts to calculating the height that the water would shoot up if it came straight down from a broken pipe. The solution involves using Bernoulli's Equation and considering factors such as atmospheric pressure, initial velocity, and fluid density. The resulting equation is short and includes a radical, and it may be relevant for future academic use.
  • #1
thegreatone
5
0
Anyone please help ..

Water is fed by a tank to the bottom of a hill by a pipe which is diagonally positioned. Determine the gauge pressure?

I was able to do that.

Now it says what if the water came straight down from a broken pipe (straigth vertically)... how high would it shoot up?

How can I do this?
 
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  • #2
Have you learned Bernoulli's Equation yet? If so, then you have the gauge pressure, which will be denoted as P1, P2 will be assumed atmospheric, so it will cancel out. You can also assume the initial velocity to be 0. You will have a difference in heights, so given the type of fluid (water) with a given density, you should be able to solve for final velocity.

You will end up with an equation which is pretty short, has a radical in it, and you will probably use it later on throughout school.
 
  • #3


To determine how high the water would shoot up, you would need to use the Bernoulli's equation, which relates the pressure, velocity, and height of a fluid. You would need to know the initial pressure at the broken pipe, the velocity of the water as it exits the pipe, and the height difference between the broken pipe and the highest point the water reaches. You could also use conservation of energy to solve for the height. It would be best to consult with a physics expert or use an online calculator to accurately solve this problem.
 

Related to How High Will Water Shoot from a Broken Vertical Pipe?

What is pressure in a pipe in fluid?

Pressure in a pipe in fluid refers to the force exerted by the fluid on the walls of the pipe. This force is caused by the weight of the fluid above and is measured in units of force per unit area, such as pounds per square inch (psi) or pascals (Pa).

How is pressure in a pipe in fluid calculated?

Pressure in a pipe in fluid is calculated using the equation P = ρgh, where P is the pressure, ρ is the density of the fluid, g is the acceleration due to gravity, and h is the height of the fluid column above the point of measurement. This equation assumes that the fluid is incompressible and at rest.

What factors affect pressure in a pipe in fluid?

The pressure in a pipe in fluid is affected by several factors, including the density and weight of the fluid, the height of the fluid column, the diameter and length of the pipe, and the type of fluid flow (e.g. laminar or turbulent).

Why is pressure in a pipe in fluid important?

Pressure in a pipe in fluid is important because it determines the flow rate of the fluid through the pipe. In other words, the higher the pressure, the faster the fluid will flow. Pressure is also important in applications such as plumbing, hydraulics, and fluid mechanics.

How can pressure in a pipe in fluid be controlled?

Pressure in a pipe in fluid can be controlled by adjusting the height of the fluid column, changing the diameter and length of the pipe, or using valves and pumps to regulate the flow rate. In some cases, pressure regulators may also be used to maintain a specific pressure level in the pipe.

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