How to make Gallium/Molybdenum Alloy?

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In summary, creating a consistent metallic alloy of gallium and molybdenum can be difficult due to the difference in melting points and density. Levitation melting or a powdered metal approach with hot-isostatic pressure may be effective methods. It is also important to consider the proportions and purity of the alloy.
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hagopbul
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I am trying to make an metallic alloy consist of gallium and Molybdenum but it is all ways form in non-consist[homogeneous ] alloy… look to the attachment but in the market there is one … how I make it?
Do I need to change the Temperature … or something else
 

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Alloying very light or low melting point metals with heavier or high melting metals is quite challenging, and conventional pouring/casting won't work. The higher melting metal freezes first, and if denser would sink in the melt and exclude the low melting metal.

One method is to use levitation melting followed by a rapid quench. An alternative would involve a powdered metal approach with hot-isostatic pressure.

Does it have to be pure Mo-Ga? and in what proportions?
 

1. How do I obtain Gallium and Molybdenum for the alloy?

Both Gallium and Molybdenum can be purchased from chemical supply companies or online retailers. They can also be extracted from their respective ores through a chemical process.

2. What is the ratio of Gallium to Molybdenum in the alloy?

The most common ratio for Gallium/Molybdenum alloy is 50:50. However, the ratio can vary depending on the specific properties desired for the alloy.

3. Can the alloy be made in a home laboratory?

Yes, it is possible to make the alloy in a home laboratory, but it requires proper safety precautions and knowledge of the chemical processes involved. It is recommended to have proper training and equipment before attempting to make the alloy at home.

4. What temperature is needed to melt the alloy?

The melting point of Gallium/Molybdenum alloy is around 1350°C (2462°F). It is important to use proper heating equipment and to monitor the temperature carefully to avoid overheating and potential hazards.

5. What are the most common uses for Gallium/Molybdenum alloy?

Gallium/Molybdenum alloy is commonly used in the aerospace industry for its high strength and resistance to corrosion. It is also used in the production of electronic components and in nuclear reactors due to its ability to withstand high temperatures and radiation.

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