Question About Electric Circuit

In summary, the conversation is about finding the magnitude of ##I_{ab}## and the suggested methods include using the potential divider method and applying Kirchoff's Current Law (KCL). The expert advises to first find the voltage on a/b and then use KCL to calculate the currents through the resistors. Alternatively, one can directly apply KCL without finding the voltage first.
  • #1
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Homework Statement



Please give me a clue, I don't understand, how to find the magnitude of ##I_{ab}##?

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Homework Equations

The Attempt at a Solution

 
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  • #2
What have you tried so far? Are you familiar with KCL?
 
  • #3
Have you worked out the voltage on a/b?
 
  • #4
cnh1995 said:
What have you tried so far? Are you familiar with KCL?

I am stuck. What is KCL? Is it Kirchoff's Current Law?

CWatters said:
Have you worked out the voltage on a/b?

How?
 
  • #5
askor said:
I am stuck. What is KCL? Is it Kirchoff's Current Law?

Yes.

Have you worked out the voltage on a/b?

How?

"a" and "b" are at the same voltage because they are connected together. To work out that voltage you can simplify the circuit and use the potential divider method. There are other ways.

Once you have that voltage you can calculate the currents through all the resistors. Then apply KCL at either a or b.

or you can just wade in and apply KCL from the outset.
 

1. What is an electric circuit?

An electric circuit is a path through which electric current can flow. It is made up of a power source, conductors, and loads, which are devices that use the electric energy to perform functions.

2. How does an electric circuit work?

An electric circuit works by allowing electrons to flow from the negative terminal of the power source, through the conductors, and back to the positive terminal of the power source. This flow of electrons creates an electric current, which can power devices or perform other functions.

3. What are the different types of electric circuits?

There are several different types of electric circuits, including series circuits, parallel circuits, and combination circuits. Series circuits have only one path for the current to flow through, while parallel circuits have multiple paths. Combination circuits are a mix of series and parallel circuits.

4. What is the difference between AC and DC circuits?

AC (alternating current) circuits have a constantly changing direction of current flow, while DC (direct current) circuits have a constant direction of current flow. AC is typically used for long-distance power transmission, while DC is used for smaller devices and electronics.

5. How do you calculate voltage, current, and resistance in an electric circuit?

Voltage (V) is calculated by dividing the amount of electrical energy by the amount of charge. Current (I) is calculated by dividing the amount of charge by the time it takes for the charge to move. Resistance (R) is calculated by dividing the voltage by the current.

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