Resistance of Non-Conductors: Temperature Effects

In summary, the resistance of non-conducting materials such as a brick decreases with temperature due to increased agitation of molecules. This is different from conductors, where resistance increases with temperature due to increased scattering. Resistances for specific objects can be found on websites such as Google, matweb.com, or through university resources such as the CRC Handbook of Physics and Chemistry.
  • #1
AdmiralZ
2
0
How does the resistance of a non-conductor, eg. a brick change with temperature. Does it conform to the wire where resistance increases with temperature, or is it different?
 
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  • #2
For non conducting materials, resistance would decrease with temperature. Heat is, more or less, agitation of molecules in a substance. If the temperature is great enough, electrons can be ripped from the atoms, thus allowing a current to flow.
 
  • #3
It is very different. A "wire" is usually a conductor, whose resistivity increases with temperature due to increased scattering off the positive ions. A brick is usually an insulator (at room temp) whose resistivity decreases on heating, due to thermal excitations.
Look at this : https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=72062&highlight=brick
 
  • #4
Thanks guys. Also, would any of you happen to know of a site where I could find the resistances for certain objects?
 
  • #5
1. Google
2. matweb.com
3. CRC Handbook of Physics and Chemistry (universities usually have access to an online version)
 

Related to Resistance of Non-Conductors: Temperature Effects

What is the relationship between resistance and temperature?

The resistance of a material increases as its temperature increases. This is because as the temperature increases, the atoms in the material vibrate more, causing more collisions with electrons and increasing the material's resistance.

Why does resistance increase with temperature?

As the temperature increases, the atoms in the material vibrate more, causing more collisions with electrons. This increased collision rate leads to a higher resistance as there is more opposition to the flow of electric current.

Is there a specific formula to calculate the resistance of a material at different temperatures?

Yes, the formula is R = R0(1 + α(T-T0)), where R is the resistance at temperature T, R0 is the resistance at a reference temperature T0, and α is the temperature coefficient of resistance for the material.

How does the temperature coefficient of resistance vary among different materials?

The temperature coefficient of resistance varies among different materials and is dependent on their atomic structure and bonding. For example, metals typically have a positive α, while semiconductors have a negative α.

Can temperature affect the accuracy of electronic devices?

Yes, temperature can affect the resistance of electronic components, which can lead to inaccuracies in their functioning. This is why many electronic devices have temperature compensation circuits to minimize the impact of temperature on their accuracy.

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