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Shear angle

  1. Jan 26, 2016 #1

    Suraj M

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    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    image.jpeg

    2. Relevant equations
    ## L\phi = r \theta##

    3. The attempt at a solution
    Firstly I'm not sure what ##\phi## and ##\theta## mean in the equation,
    If I were to attempt I'd want to equate the lengths
    $$ \frac{2r\theta_1}{\phi} = \frac{r\theta_2}{\phi} $$
    I felt ##\theta_2## is zero and ##\theta_1 = \phi in the question##
    Definitely wrong
    Could you help?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 26, 2016 #2
    The cylinders are made of the same material, they are of the same length and the torque is constant vs. the whole length - their torsional stiffness and the angle only depend on the geometry.

    First of all: Can you eliminate two answers without any calculations?
    Secondly: Do you know what geometrical dependent property defines the torsional stiffness of a body?
     
  4. Jan 26, 2016 #3

    Suraj M

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    C and D are gone since they're more than the original angle
    Geometrical dependent property? sorry but no
    Where can o find out more
    Our teacher didn't even teach us this topic but there are questions on it
     
  5. Jan 26, 2016 #4
    The torsional stiffness depends on the geometry of the body - it seems to be quite obvious, that the cylinder with the larger diameter is more stiff, than the cylinder with the smaller diameter. But how much? You need the look up the area moment of inertia. This property is a measure for the resistance of the body against deformation. In your case, a body applied to a torque, you need to find out the polar area moment of inertia of a rigid cylinder.

    Comparing the polar area moments of inertia of two cylinders with r and 2⋅r (by dividing one by the other) will give the answer to your question.

    EDIT: Your thougt regarding answers C and D is correct.
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2016
  6. Jan 26, 2016 #5

    Nidum

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    Here is a simple tutorial on torsion of shafts which will help you understand the background theory to your problem :

    http://www.slideshare.net/osmak93/mm2105a
     
  7. Jan 26, 2016 #6

    haruspex

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    If you work out what the a and b choices translate into in terms the ratio between the twist in one cylinder and the twist in the other, it's kind of obvious which one to choose, even without understanding any of the theory.
     
  8. Jan 27, 2016 #7

    Suraj M

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    I'm really sorry but I didn't quite follow after they derived the basic formula relating length radius and angle
     
  9. Jan 27, 2016 #8

    Suraj M

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    How could I decide between A and B without solving?
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2016
  10. Jan 27, 2016 #9

    Suraj M

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    Oh wait
    Is it like this?
    $$ \frac{\phi - \theta}{\theta-0} = (\frac{r}{2r})^4 $$??
    Then I get option B
    Right?
     
  11. Jan 27, 2016 #10
    Where did you get the formula you use (and you showed in your first post) from? And what does θ stand for in this equation? It doesn't seem very common to me, I would try to solve the task in a different way - but I don't have to deal with strength of materials on a regular basis, so maybe my thought is not correct.
     
  12. Jan 27, 2016 #11

    haruspex

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    Yes.
     
  13. Jan 27, 2016 #12

    Suraj M

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    The first formula in the original post is the same as the one in the link Nidum provided
    Except the change in symbols
    That theta isn't the one I used here in post #9
    I'm sorry for that
    I took theta to be the angle of twist at the junction
    And then I thought that the angle would be inversely proportional to the polar moment of inertia, which is actually a function of ## r^4##
    So I equated that
    As I've shown
    I don't know if it's right
    I just used some basic logic to link the difference in the angle at one end and the resulting twist angle at the other end to radius
    Could you direct me to a more refined way?
     
  14. Jan 27, 2016 #13

    Suraj M

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    And this-?
     
  15. Jan 27, 2016 #14

    haruspex

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    Having got it down to a choice of A 15:1, and B 16:1, and knowing the radius ratio is 2:1, the twist ratio of 16:1 looks far more likely.
     
  16. Jan 27, 2016 #15

    Suraj M

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    Ah! Okey
    Thanks a ton EVERYONE
    Really appreciate it
     
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