Solar heating Project: Need much help-Thanks

In summary, a solar heating project is a system that uses solar panels to convert sunlight into heat for spaces or water. It offers benefits such as cost savings and reducing carbon emissions, but factors such as location, orientation, and maintenance needs should be considered. Potential limitations include reliance on sunlight and higher installation costs.
  • #1
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Solar Heating Project: formula Q/t= A changing T/ R

Homework Statement



At this moment I have a project whose due date forever looms closer and I'm still troublesome about how to conquer it. Objective: to design a solar heating system for my house building that will provide 50% of the heat.

Step 1: I have to figure out how much heat my house looses each month using the formula Q/t= A changing T/ R. "...You can find changing temp. by looking at the "degree data" on the website. For example , if March has 1000 heating degree days, and there are 31 days in the month, the average temperature during March is 65 - 1000/31= 32.7 degrees Fahrenheit. "

Where did the number "65" come from? Also, Ave. outside temp. = 18 - (degree heating days/ # of days in a month)= the answer (the final should be changed into Celsius)

Here are my "A" measurements that I've simplified it into this here, presenting the areas:

House L x W x H = 27 ft. x 17 ft. x 18 ft. 6 in. = 324 in. x 204 in. x 222 in. = 66096 in. x 222 in. = 14673312 in. / 144 sq in. = 101898 sq ft.
Kitchen window #1 = 36 in. x 27 in. = 972 in. / 144 sq in. = 6. 75 sq ft
Kitchen window #2 and Living room window #4 = 55 in. x 27 in. = 1485 in. / 144 sq in. = 10.3125 sq ft. x 2 = 20. 625 sq ft.
Back Door and Front Door = 7 ft. x 3 ft. = 21 sq ft. x 2 = 42 sq ft.
Basement Door = 6 ft. x 30 in. = 72 in. x 30 in. = 2160 in. / 144 sq in. = 15 sq ft.
Basement windows #1, #2, #3, and #4 = 15 in x 33 in. = 495 in. / 144 sq in. = 3. 4375 sq ft. x 4 = 13. 75 sq ft.
Kitchen closet Door, Living room closet Door, Bathroom Door, Me and sister closet Door, Upstairs hallways closet Door, Brothers closet Door, Mum and brothers closet Door = 80 in. x 28 in. = 2240 in. / 144 sq in. = 15.67 sq ft. x 7 = 108.9 sq ft.
Living room windows #1, #2, and #3 = 52 in. x 32 in. = 1664 in. / 144 sq in. = 11.6 sq ft. x 3 = 34. 8 sq ft.
Me and sister windows #1 and #2, Brothers windows #1 and #2, Mum and brothers windows #1 and #2 = 45 in. x 27 in. = 1215 in. / 144 sq in. = 8. 4375 sq ft. x 6 = 50. 625 sq ft.
Me and sister Door, Brothers Door, Mum and brothers Door = 80 in. x 30 in. = 2400 in. / 144 sq in. = 16.67 sq ft. x 3 = 50 sq ft.

"R" Values

Wood = R 0.91
Insulating Glass = R 1.54
Sheetrock = R 0. 45

http://www.joeruff.com/artruff/physics/Thermodynamics/Example_solar_heating.pdf

http://www.joeruff.com/artruff/physics/Thermodynamics/data.htm

(these websites are needed to better continue- it gives the days of a month, but simply a head start and other neccesities like the temperature. I don't really know how to use this information. 100% needed.)

Homework Equations

:

Q/t= A changing T/ R
Ave. outside temp. = 18 - (degree heating days/ # of days in a month)= answer in Celsius hopefully
Q = C m changing Temp.

Here are useful conversions:
1 BTU = 1055 Joules
1 kWh = 3413 BTU
1 m^3 of water = 1000 kg
1 meter = 3.3 ft.
Fahrenheit = Celsius x 1.8 + 32

The Attempt at a Solution

: Attempt included somewhere in the mix.

Please help me get on track! I'm desperate at this momemt. Here is only step one. Step two would have pressured you not to help, so I took that part out. I don't know what to do. I edited parts of this. I read about what to do. Argh...

Again, if you're familar with this formula: Q/t= A changing T/ R, then please assist me. The temperatures are on the websites. If the websites aren't assesible please comment, and Ill do what I can.
 
Last edited:
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  • #2


I understand your struggle with your solar heating project and I am here to assist you in understanding the formula Q/t= A changing T/ R. Let's break it down step by step.

Q/t represents the heat loss per unit time, which we want to calculate for your house. The units for Q/t are energy per time, such as Joules per second or BTUs per hour.

A represents the surface area of your house. In this case, we need to calculate the total surface area of all the walls, windows, and doors that are exposed to the outside environment. You have provided measurements for each of these surfaces, so we can use those to calculate the total surface area.

Changing T represents the change in temperature between the inside and outside of your house. This is the temperature difference that drives heat loss. The larger the temperature difference, the more heat will be lost. We can use the average outside temperature and the average inside temperature to calculate this difference.

R represents the thermal resistance of the materials that make up the walls, windows, and doors of your house. The higher the R value, the better the material is at insulating and preventing heat loss. You have provided R values for wood, insulating glass, and sheetrock, which we can use in our calculations.

Now, to answer your question about where the number 65 came from. In the example given, it is assuming that the average inside temperature for the month of March is 65 degrees Fahrenheit. This may not be the case for your house, so you will need to use the actual average inside temperature for your house.

Using the formula Q/t= A changing T/ R, we can calculate the heat loss per unit time for your house. This will give us an idea of how much heat your house is losing and how much solar heating will be needed to make up for it. From there, we can move on to designing a solar heating system that will provide 50% of the heat needed for your house.

I hope this helps you understand the formula better and get started on your project. If you have any further questions, please don't hesitate to ask. Good luck!
 
  • #3


Hello,

Thank you for reaching out for help with your solar heating project. It seems like you have made some progress in calculating the areas and R values for your house, which is a great start. However, it looks like you are still struggling with understanding the formula Q/t= A changing T/ R.

The number 65 in the example calculation is the average temperature during the month of March. This value can be found by subtracting the degree heating days from the average temperature of 65 degrees Fahrenheit. It is important to note that this is just an example and you will need to calculate the average temperature for each month using the degree data from the website.

To calculate the average outside temperature in Celsius, you can use the formula Ave. outside temp. = 18 - (degree heating days/ # of days in a month). This will give you the answer in Fahrenheit, which can then be converted to Celsius using the conversion formula provided.

To continue with your project, you will need to use the Q/t= A changing T/ R formula to calculate the amount of heat your house loses each month. This will give you an idea of how much heat your solar heating system needs to generate.

I recommend breaking down your project into smaller steps and tackling them one at a time. Take some time to review the formula and make sure you understand how to use it. You can also reach out to your teacher or a tutor for additional help and clarification.

I wish you the best of luck with your project! Remember to stay organized and don't be afraid to ask for help when you need it.
 

Related to Solar heating Project: Need much help-Thanks

1. What is a solar heating project?

A solar heating project is a system that uses the sun's energy to heat spaces or water. It typically consists of solar panels, a heat transfer mechanism, and a storage unit.

2. How does a solar heating project work?

Solar heating projects work by capturing sunlight using solar panels, which then convert the sunlight into heat. The heat is transferred to a storage unit or directly to the space or water that needs to be heated.

3. What are the benefits of a solar heating project?

There are several benefits to using a solar heating project, including reducing energy costs, using a renewable energy source, and reducing carbon emissions. It can also provide hot water or heating during power outages.

4. What factors should be considered when planning a solar heating project?

When planning a solar heating project, it is essential to consider the location, orientation, and size of the solar panels, as well as the heat transfer mechanism and storage capacity. Other factors to consider include local climate, budget, and energy needs.

5. Are there any potential challenges or limitations with a solar heating project?

Some potential challenges or limitations with a solar heating project include initial costs, maintenance needs, and the reliance on sunlight. In areas with low sunlight or during periods of heavy cloud cover, the system may not be as effective. Additionally, the initial installation costs can be higher compared to traditional heating systems.

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