What is the pressure surrounding a liquid at its boiling point?

In summary, the boiling point is the temperature at which the vapor pressure of a liquid is equal to the pressure surrounding it. In a room with 20C and 1 atm pressure, the surrounding pressure would be 1 atm. If a pot of water in this room is heated and vapor starts to form, the pressure within the room may increase if there is no ventilation. In the case of a pressurized container or cargo tank, the pressure surrounding the liquid will depend on the initial pressure and whether there is air in the tank. The boiling point in a closed tank with air will increase as the temperature rises, potentially leading to a doubling of pressure.
  • #1
dromeascr
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Hello everyone, before I start I just want to mention that I am not an expert in physics whatsoever, so please be as specific as you can get if you wish to provide an answer. (The question itself might be considered stupid to be honest)

I read the definition of the boiling point recently and according to wikipedia, boiling point is the temperature at which the vapor pressure equals the pressure surrounding the liquid. So my question is, what exactly is the pressure surrounding the liquid? For example we have a pot filled with water in room conditions (20C, 1 atm pressure). What is the value of the pressure surrounding the liquid at such conditions? If we warm up the pot and vapor starts getting generated, will that also increase the atmospheric pressure within the room as well?

In case of a pressurized container or cargo tank, what is again the pressure surrounding the liquid? At boiling point, the vapor pressure generated will double the pressure within the tank?

Thanks for your time in advance if you take the time to reply. It would be super helpful.
 
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  • #2
dromeascr said:
what exactly is the pressure surrounding the liquid?
dromeascr said:
1 atm
dromeascr said:
will that also increase the atmospheric pressure within the room as well?
Only if the room is unvented.
dromeascr said:
pressurized container or cargo tank, what is again the pressure surrounding the liquid?
Whatever the pressure happens to be; presumably the tank is closed/sealed, and may be regarded as a "system."
 
  • #3
dromeascr said:
In case of a pressurized container or cargo tank, what is again the pressure surrounding the liquid? At boiling point, the vapor pressure generated will double the pressure within the tank?
It depends on whether air is in the tank to start with. Also, in a closed tank with air, the boiling point will be increasing as the temperature rises (and you continue to add heat).
 

Related to What is the pressure surrounding a liquid at its boiling point?

1. What is vapor pressure?

Vapor pressure is the pressure exerted by a vapor (gas phase) in equilibrium with its condensed phase (liquid or solid) at a given temperature.

2. How is vapor pressure measured?

Vapor pressure can be measured using specialized equipment such as a vapor pressure balance or a gas chromatograph. It can also be calculated using the Antoine equation, which relates vapor pressure to temperature.

3. What factors affect vapor pressure?

The vapor pressure of a substance is affected by temperature, intermolecular forces, and the nature of the substance itself. In general, higher temperatures and weaker intermolecular forces result in higher vapor pressures.

4. Why is vapor pressure important?

Vapor pressure is important in many areas of science, including chemistry, physics, and meteorology. It is used to understand and predict the behavior of substances in gaseous form, as well as to determine the boiling point and volatility of liquids.

5. How does vapor pressure relate to evaporation and condensation?

Vapor pressure is closely related to evaporation and condensation. As the temperature of a liquid increases, more molecules gain enough energy to escape into the gas phase, increasing the vapor pressure. When the vapor pressure of a liquid equals the atmospheric pressure, the liquid will boil and evaporate. Similarly, when the vapor pressure of a gas decreases, molecules will condense back into the liquid phase.

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