Which of these technologies would be hard to do in Star Wars?

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This Wiki page I've been editing for months with stuff I've read on the internet. Based on existing science and tech already available in Star Wars, which of these would be challenging for a scientist in Star Wars to create? Try to explain why and you can pick multiple entries. Remember, Star Wars is more advanced then the movies often show.

 

phinds

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This Wiki page I've been editing for months with stuff I've read on the internet. Based on existing science and tech already available in Star Wars, which of these would be challenging for a scientist in Star Wars to create? Try to explain why and you can pick multiple entries. Remember, Star Wars is more advanced then the movies often show.

Which one do YOU think and why?
 

Vanadium 50

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, which of these would be challenging for a scientist in Star Wars to create?
X-ray specs.
 
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Which one do YOU think and why?
I’ve been trying to pick for days. I am extremely indecisive which probably has something to do with my OCD.
 
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Awesome Wiki page, well done 👍

And from what I've seen in the movies and the couple of Alan Dean Foster Star Wars books I've read, I'd say none of this tech is beyond realization in the Star Wars universe, and the staples - AG, AI, FTL - are clearly already present.

But if I'm forced to choose, it has to be femtotechnology. The distances involved are smaller than atomic nucleus, and light barely has time to do anything useful at this scale. It just seems too minuscule for my monkey brain to comprehend us being able to reliably manipulate.
 

BWV

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Star wars is pure fantasy, it is not science fiction. Therefore it is pointless to speculate on real science within it
 

phinds

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Star wars is pure fantasy, it is not science fiction. Therefore it is pointless to speculate on real science within it
I understand where you're coming from on that but I think that's a bit harsh. It IS science fiction, just SF where the science is not taken seriously.
 

BWV

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I understand where you're coming from on that but I think that's a bit harsh. It IS science fiction, just SF where the science is not taken seriously.
No, the genre conventions and tropes are 100% fantasy, there is not the slightest pretense of science. Like fantasy, it retells old myths and archetypes. It just has spaceships and laser swords instead of castles and magic swords. Not a negative thing, its good fantasy (but horrible SF). Dune is similar - a fantasy story in a futuristic setting.
 

phinds

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No, the genre conventions and tropes are 100% fantasy, there is not the slightest pretense of science.
Yeah, actually I was thinking more of Star Trek.
 

DEvens

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The Alcubierre drive is going to be pretty challenging at any rate. I have been trying to read the various papers about it. The original version has negative mass density, which is quite difficult to imagine there is any way to produce. There have been a stack of papers published about it and they make a variety of claims I can just about understand, but not follow the proofs. It seems like this one is possibly physically impossible, and certainly requires things that are outside what we have even a glimmer of a hint of how to do. I don't think there is any way in Star Wars, or Star Trek, to do this one.

Warp Drive in science fiction is nearly always fueled by drama-ions. That is, quantums of drama supplied by the author in exactly the right quantity to make the story work.
 
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Star wars is pure fantasy, it is not science fiction. Therefore it is pointless to speculate on real science within it
Why so grumpy? Star Wars has the same degree of handwavium and unobtanium that you read in pretty much all future tech sci-fi, and we speculate on that all the time in the Science Fiction and Fantasy forum!

But did you even look at @Maximum7's Wiki entries? It's a terrific reference and is not really informed by Star Wars (no lightsaber, no Death Star, no Force) but is full of the concepts that pepper this forum on a regular basis. I say, "Jolly good show," not "Poo pah!"
 
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Why so grumpy? Star Wars has the same degree of handwavium and unobtanium that you read in pretty much all future tech sci-fi, and we speculate on that all the time in the Science Fiction and Fantasy forum!

But did you even look at @Maximum7's Wiki entries? It's a terrific reference and is not really informed by Star Wars (no lightsaber, no Death Star, no Force) but is full of the concepts that pepper this forum on a regular basis. I say, "Jolly good show," not "Poo pah!"
Thank-you 😀

I’ve also heavily contributed to Wiki’s “List of emerging technologies”
 

BWV

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Why so grumpy? Star Wars has the same degree of handwavium and unobtanium that you read in pretty much all future tech sci-fi, and we speculate on that all the time in the Science Fiction and Fantasy forum!
Not grumpy at all and I like Star Wars, but the genre is pure fantasy. There is no attempt at science in Star Wars - which again, as it’s fantasy - is a good thing. Star Wars does not really have technology, it’s all basically magic.
 
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Not grumpy at all and I like Star Wars, but the genre is pure fantasy. There is no attempt at science in Star Wars - which again, as it’s fantasy - is a good thing. Star Wars does not really have technology, it’s all basically magic.
Yes many people say that but it’s wrong. If you read the books, you know their is a TON of science going on behind the scenes and let’s just say hypothetically; you lived in the Star Wars galaxy, you would find that science fuels civilization; not magic. Very few people have even seen a Jedi and the only reason is that the Skywalker Saga is focused on that small aspect.
 

BWV

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that’s like saying few people in middle earth have ever seen a wizard or an orc. If what you say about the books is truer then it’s sad that the authors feel a need to try to ‘legitimize’ the story with a veneer or science. From its original conception it was a pure fantasy story with magic, and a princesses to rescue from a dark lord in a castle
 
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Not grumpy at all
Thanks for that, it seemed you were grumpy.

Surprisingly to me, there are a lot of sites that try to explain what's going on behind the Star Wars scenes and while it's obviously not science as we know it, it is based on consistent physical processes that are not magic as you'd see in Harry Potter. So, lightsabers are plasma-based and require a certain type of crystal to activate and need to be imbibed with the Force to operate. (Which makes a little more sense than my youthful understanding that they were lasers somehow 'blunted' so the light beam only traveled a short way.)

We're probably splitting hairs, but I agree it's essentially fantasy in the context of 'make believe', but not fantasy in the context of 'completely arbitrary'.
 

BWV

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But good fantasy has ‘rules’ for its magic just like Star Wars, so that is not a fair comparison. And I have a much more specific definition of fantasy - which is a story that looks back to old myths and archetypes. Basically if you can find most of the story in premodern literature then its fantasy. Again, I like fantasy so it’s not a derogatory term
 
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But good fantasy has ‘rules’ for its magic just like Star Wars
That's a good point, and thinking about it, my distinction is 'technology' based such that the affect is independent of the person, though it's interesting to actually work through because, at heart, most good stories of any genre are mythic and utilize archetypes.

So, as a magic example, Harry Dresden casts his spells etc. usually via a physical object, and he's needed to imbibe the magic into or through objects. He can't just give anyone a list of actions to perform, and the magic happens. Obviously, there is some of that in Star Wars, esp. with the Jedi and use of the Force, but there is a lot of tech-based action as well. Anyone with sufficient skill can fly the Millennium Falcon and it does not need magic to operate.

Hmmm, it's actually a messy demarcation, I think the duck test might be my arbiter in the end!
 
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Thanks for that, it seemed you were grumpy.

Surprisingly to me, there are a lot of sites that try to explain what's going on behind the Star Wars scenes and while it's obviously not science as we know it, it is based on consistent physical processes that are not magic as you'd see in Harry Potter. So, lightsabers are plasma-based and require a certain type of crystal to activate and need to be imbibed with the Force to operate. (Which makes a little more sense than my youthful understanding that they were lasers somehow 'blunted' so the light beam only traveled a short way.)

We're probably splitting hairs, but I agree it's essentially fantasy in the context of 'make believe', but not fantasy in the context of 'completely arbitrary'.
Actually it was said in a book that scientists never really understood how lightsabers worked and it makes it seem that they are yes- have a mystical aspect to it.

However, nanotechnology is mentioned many times throughout the books.
 
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scientists never really understood how lightsabers worked
Is this scientists in our world, or scientists in the Star Wars world?

Actually, lightsabers are pretty much magic in both worlds :wink:
 
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Awesome Wiki page, well done 👍

And from what I've seen in the movies and the couple of Alan Dean Foster Star Wars books I've read, I'd say none of this tech is beyond realization in the Star Wars universe, and the staples - AG, AI, FTL - are clearly already present.

But if I'm forced to choose, it has to be femtotechnology. The distances involved are smaller than atomic nucleus, and light barely has time to do anything useful at this scale. It just seems too minuscule for my monkey brain to comprehend us being able to reliably manipulate.
Thanks dude!
 
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No, the genre conventions and tropes are 100% fantasy, there is not the slightest pretense of science. Like fantasy, it retells old myths and archetypes. It just has spaceships and laser swords instead of castles and magic swords.
I agree. The first movie is a classic fairy tale ingeniously set in space. We have a princess, knights/wizards (Jedi, Obi-Wan), magic (the Force), evil lords, monsters and a mix of mythologies.

I recently saw a documentary, Empire of Dreams: The Story of the 'Star Wars' Trilogy, which among other things described the origins which were based on a variety of mythologies (see clip here).

Dune is similar - a fantasy story in a futuristic setting.
I agree. And I think the first Dune novel is among the very best SF novels written. And there are actually quite a number of similarities between Dune and Star Wars. And Dune (1965) came before Star Wars (1977). Here is a fun page describing the striking similarities: http://www.moongadget.com/origins/dune.html.
For those who are SF/Star Wars fans and have not read Dune, I warmly recommend reading it. :smile:
 
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