Why some materials bounce off more than the others?

In summary, materials have different levels of hardness and softer materials will experience plastic deformation at lower stress/load levels than others. There is always some permanent deformation at the contact surfaces. This is why some materials behave more elastically than others. The level of bounciness of a material can be attributed to its elastic properties, such as the Gibbs free energy. This can be seen in the example of a rubber ball bouncing more than a wooden or rock ball due to its elastic properties. The article referenced also mentions the weight of the ball (5 1/8) as a factor in its bouncing ability.
  • #1
Physicsissuef
908
0
why some materials bounce off more than the others? What happens with the microstructure?
 
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  • #2
Physicsissuef said:
why some materials bounce off more than the others? What happens with the microstructure?
In other words, why do some materials behave more elastically?

Materials have different levels of hardness.

Softer materials will experience plastic deformation at lower stress/load levels than others. There is always some permanent deformation at the contact surfaces.
 
  • #3
And what is that free energy of the molecules?
 
  • #4
Physicsissuef said:
And what is that free energy of the molecules?
Please elaborate on your question about bouncing off and your use of free energy.

By free energy, does one mean Gibbs free energy?
 
  • #5
I mean like (lets say) http://tbn0.google.com/images?q=tbn:VBuYtcLqM-o8rM:http://www.ukfitnesssupplies.co.uk/mall/UKFitnessSuppliesLtd/customerimages/products/PERFECTION.jpg"
Why it bounces more than some wood or rock?
 
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  • #6
Astronuc?
 
  • #7
Physicsissuef said:
I mean like (lets say) http://tbn0.google.com/images?q=tbn:VBuYtcLqM-o8rM:http://www.ukfitnesssupplies.co.uk/mall/UKFitnessSuppliesLtd/customerimages/products/PERFECTION.jpg"
Why it bounces more than some wood or rock?

Like Astronuc said, they 'bounce' due to their elastic properties...

http://www.exploratorium.edu/sports/ball_bounces/ballbounces2.html

CS
 
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  • #9
Physicsissuef said:
And what is that 5 1/8 on the article?

The weight of the baseball like the article says.

CS
 

Related to Why some materials bounce off more than the others?

1. Why do some materials bounce off surfaces more than others?

There are several factors that contribute to a material's ability to bounce off surfaces. One of the main factors is elasticity, which is the ability of a material to deform under stress and then return to its original shape. Materials with high elasticity, such as rubber, tend to bounce off surfaces more than those with low elasticity, like clay.

2. How does the surface of a material affect its bounciness?

The surface of a material plays a crucial role in its ability to bounce off surfaces. Smooth, hard surfaces, such as glass or metal, tend to reflect more energy and result in a higher bounce compared to rough or soft surfaces, which absorb more energy and lead to a lower bounce.

3. What is the relationship between the weight of a material and its bounciness?

The weight of a material can affect its bounciness in a few ways. Heavier materials tend to have more inertia, meaning they are more resistant to changes in motion. Therefore, they may not bounce as high as lighter materials. Additionally, the weight of a material can affect the amount of force it exerts on a surface, which can impact its bounce.

4. Are there any factors other than elasticity and surface that affect a material's bounciness?

Yes, there are other factors that can influence a material's bounciness. Some of these include the temperature of the material, the angle at which it hits the surface, and the amount of air resistance present. These factors can all impact the amount of energy that is absorbed or reflected by the material, and thus affect its bounce.

5. Can the shape of a material affect its bounciness?

Yes, the shape of a material can have an impact on its bounciness. For example, a spherical object will typically bounce higher than a flat object of the same material and weight. This is because the spherical shape allows for a more even distribution of force, resulting in a higher bounce.

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