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Homework Help: Energy diagram for hybridized oxygen in CO

  1. Dec 7, 2017 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    Please look at the screenshot attached. The answer is "Yes", but I am not sure why.

    2. Relevant equations
    N/A

    3. The attempt at a solution
    Oxygen have six electrons, but the energy diagram shows only five. That was why I thought it was wrong, but the diagram shown is correct. Can anyone explain why?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 7, 2017 #2

    TeethWhitener

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    There have to be six electrons. Oxygen isn’t charged in CO. The diagram must be wrong.
     
  4. Dec 7, 2017 #3

    Bystander

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    ..., unless, it's for bonding electrons from both carbon and oxygen? Seem to recall some sort of quasi-quantum mechanical argument for "bonding/anti-bonding orbitals."
     
  5. Dec 8, 2017 #4

    TeethWhitener

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    The MO diagram for CO is isoelectronic to N2 and will have either 6 or 10 electrons, depending on whether you choose to include the σ-σ* bonding-antibonding pair generated from the 2s electrons. The point of the exercise is doubtless to highlight the energy splitting due to the hybridization of s and p orbitals on oxygen, but in no world is 5 electrons correct.
     
  6. Dec 11, 2017 #5

    DrDu

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    How the heck do you hybridize a diagram?
    Furthermore, there is no reason why O in CO should be hybridized at all.
     
  7. Dec 11, 2017 #6

    TeethWhitener

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    I agree, it doesn’t make much sense for a diatomic. I imagine the point was to show the effects of hybridization on s and p orbital energies, but that’s probably the least of the problems with this example.
     
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