Gas Flow Rate Calculation using Pressure Drop

In summary, the flow rate calculator from PipeFlowCalculations.com leads to a flow velocity of 0.32 m/s in a tube with a 3/16 in diameter and a 20 psi starting pressure. At 2000 L/s, the flow rate results in a pressure drop of 2 psi.
  • #1
mallorn
1
0

Homework Statement


Hi everyone,

I'm trying to calculate the flow rate of air in straight tubing that is 30cm long and has a diameter of .1875 in and has an outlet into a 100 mL vial which is vented to the atmosphere. The starting of the system pressure is 20 psi and the ending psi is 14.6, since it's in equilibrium with the atmosphere. The end goal of the problem is to see how long it takes to completely flush the vial with air three times. To do that, I'd need the volumetric flow rate of the air in the tubing.

Homework Equations

and

The Attempt at a Solution



I was using the flow rate calculator from pipeflowcalculations.com but got a result (.002 cubic meters/sec, which is 120,000 mL/min) that I wanted to confirm using manual calculations.

However, I've been running into some problems that I wanted to consult with you guys:

I was thinking to calculate it using the Darcy-Weisenbach equation V=sqrt(2g*Pressure Drop/density* (length/diameter)*darcy friction factor. Would it be ok to ignore the friction factor in this case since the length is so small?

Another option would be to use the definition of pressure as density*head*gravity and the equation as follows:

V= Square root (2*g*h)
Pressure/g*density= h

But when I try to solve it the units don't match up, even when I convert them all to SI.

What do you all think is the best approach and is my train of thought correct? Thank you very much!
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
I can't comment on your calculation unless you show them, units and all.

Looking at a flow rate of 0.002 cu.m./s and a tubing diameter of 3/16", the velocity of the air flowing in the tube is approximately M = 0.32, which is the threshold of where compressibility effects start to become significant.

However, given that the vial is flushed about 1200 times over, I think you're safe, although I can't figure out why this is a matter of such importance.
 
  • #4
Does 2000 liters/sec really sound reasonable to you for this system?

Chet
 
  • #5
Chestermiller said:
Does 2000 liters/sec really sound reasonable to you for this system?

Chet
Not sure where 2000 L/s comes from. OP was talking about 0.002 m3/s, which I believe is 2 L/s.
 
  • #6
SteamKing said:
Not sure where 2000 L/s comes from. OP was talking about 0.002 m3/s, which I believe is 2 L/s.
Oops. My mistake.
Chet
 
  • #7
I checked to see whether, at 2 L/s, one predicts a pressure drop of ~5 psi in this tube. I get a Reynolds number of about 50000 for this flow, so it's in the turbulent region. Assume that the temperature remains about constant. For this Reynolds number, the friction factor is about 0.005. This leads to a wall shear stress of 0.0074 psi, and a pressure drop of about 2 psi in the tube. This is on the order of the 5 psi pressure drop in the problem description. So the results are probably about right, give or take.

Chet
 

Related to Gas Flow Rate Calculation using Pressure Drop

1. What is gas flow rate calculation using pressure drop?

Gas flow rate calculation using pressure drop is a method used to determine the rate at which a gas flows through a system based on the change in pressure across the system.

2. Why is gas flow rate calculation important?

Gas flow rate calculation is important in a variety of industries, such as HVAC, chemical processing, and oil and gas, as it allows engineers and scientists to accurately design and operate systems that require a specific gas flow rate.

3. How is gas flow rate calculated using pressure drop?

The most common equation used to calculate gas flow rate is the Bernoulli's equation, which takes into account factors such as the gas density, system pressure, and pipe diameter. Other methods, such as the Darcy-Weisbach equation, can also be used depending on the specific system and conditions.

4. What are the units for gas flow rate and pressure drop?

Gas flow rate is typically measured in units of volume per unit time, such as cubic feet per minute (CFM) or liters per second (L/s). Pressure drop is measured in units of pressure, such as pounds per square inch (psi) or pascals (Pa).

5. How accurate is gas flow rate calculation using pressure drop?

The accuracy of gas flow rate calculation using pressure drop depends on various factors, including the accuracy of the input data, the assumptions made in the calculation, and the specific equation used. In most cases, a well-designed and properly executed calculation should yield accurate results within a reasonable margin of error.

Similar threads

  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
2
Replies
56
Views
3K
  • Aerospace Engineering
Replies
10
Views
970
  • Other Physics Topics
Replies
3
Views
2K
  • Materials and Chemical Engineering
Replies
1
Views
659
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • Engineering and Comp Sci Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Mechanical Engineering
Replies
15
Views
2K
Replies
31
Views
2K
Back
Top