Identifying Net Ionic Equations for Reactions

In summary, we identified the situations where a reaction is likely to occur and wrote the corresponding net ionic equations for each situation. These include chromium dipped into silver nitrate, aluminum dropped into a bath of sulfuric acid, and zinc dipped into a solution of lead (II) nitrate. Gold immersed in hydrochloric acid and nickel pellets dropped into calcium acetate did not result in a reaction. We also used solubility charts to help us determine the products of the reactions.
  • #1
trossi
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Homework Statement



For each of the following situations, identify those for which a reaction is liely to occur. For those that do occur, write a net ionic equation

a) Chromium dipped into silver nitrate.
b) B) Gold immersed in hydrochloric acid.
c) Nickel pellets dropped into calcium acetate, Ca(C2H3O2)2.
d) Aluminum dropped into a bath of sulphuric acid.
e) Zinc dipped into a solution of lead (II) nitrate.


Homework Equations


solubility charts


The Attempt at a Solution


I can't really figure out how to form a net ionic equation or how to get the charge but here is my attempt so far
a) Cr(s) + 2 AgNO3(aq) -> Cr(NO3)2(aq) + 2 Ag(s)
b) Au(s) + HCl(aq) -> no reaction
c) Ni(s) + Ca(C2H3O2)2(aq) -> no reaction
d) 2 Al(s) + 3H2SO4(aq) -> Al2(SO4)3 + 3 H2
e) Zn(s) + Pb(NO3)2(aq) -> Zn(NO3)2(aq) + Pb(s)

if anyone can look over this i'd really appreciate it
 
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  • #2


i attempted to form the net ionic equations I'm just still not sure if this is correct.

a) Chromium dipped into silver nitrate.
Cr(s) + 2 AgNO3(aq) -> Cr(NO3)2 (aq) + 2 Ag(s)
Therefore the net ionic equation is
Cr(s)+2 + Ag(aq)+ -> Cr(aq)+2 + Ag(s)+
b) Gold immersed in hydrochloric acid.
Au(s) + HCl(aq)-> no reaction
c) Nickel pellets dropped into calcium acetate, Ca(C2H3O2)2.
Ni(s) + Ca(C2H3O2)2 -> no reaction
d) Aluminum dropped into a bath of sulphuric acid.
2 Al(s) + 3 H2SO4(aq) -> Al2(SO4)3 + 3 H2
Therefore the net ionic equation is
2Al(s)+3 + H2(aq)+ -> Al2(aq)+3 + H2(g)+
e) Zinc dipped into a solution of lead (II) nitrate.
Zn(s) + Pb(NO3)2(aq) -> Zn(NO3)2(aq) + Pb(s)
Therefore the net ionic equation is
Zn(s)+2 + Pb(aq)+2 -> Zn(aq)+2 + Pb(s)+2
 
  • #3
!

Your attempt at writing net ionic equations is correct. The key to identifying the net ionic equation is to first determine the states of the reactants and products (solid, liquid, gas, aqueous) and then use the solubility rules to determine which compounds will dissociate into ions in solution. The net ionic equation only includes the species that are involved in the reaction and excludes any spectator ions that do not participate in the reaction.

a) The net ionic equation for this reaction is: Cr(s) + 2 Ag+(aq) -> Cr2+(aq) + 2 Ag(s)
b) The net ionic equation for this reaction is: Au(s) + 3 H+(aq) -> no reaction (gold is a noble metal and does not react with hydrochloric acid)
c) The net ionic equation for this reaction is: no reaction (both nickel and calcium acetate are soluble in water and do not form any insoluble compounds)
d) The net ionic equation for this reaction is: 2 Al(s) + 3 H+(aq) -> 2 Al3+(aq) + 3 H2(g)
e) The net ionic equation for this reaction is: Zn(s) + Pb2+(aq) -> Zn2+(aq) + Pb(s)

Keep in mind that the net ionic equation is only applicable to reactions that occur in aqueous solutions. For reactions involving solid or gaseous reactants, the net ionic equation may not be applicable. Also, make sure to double check the solubility rules to determine if a compound is soluble or insoluble in water. Good job on your attempt!
 

Related to Identifying Net Ionic Equations for Reactions

1. What is a net ionic equation?

A net ionic equation is a simplified version of a chemical equation that only includes the ions and molecules directly involved in the reaction. It excludes spectator ions, which are present in the reaction but do not participate in it.

2. How do I identify the net ionic equation for a reaction?

To identify the net ionic equation, you first need to write out the complete ionic equation, which shows all the ions and molecules present in the reaction. Then, cancel out the spectator ions on both sides of the equation to obtain the net ionic equation.

3. What are spectator ions?

Spectator ions are ions that are present in a reaction but do not participate in it. They are usually present in the same form on both sides of the equation and do not undergo any chemical change.

4. Why is it important to identify the net ionic equation?

Identifying the net ionic equation helps to simplify and better understand a chemical reaction. It focuses on the essential ions and molecules involved, making it easier to analyze the reaction and determine its products and reactants.

5. Are net ionic equations always necessary?

No, net ionic equations are not always necessary. They are most commonly used in acid-base reactions and precipitation reactions, where spectator ions can be easily identified. In other types of reactions, the complete ionic equation may be sufficient.

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