Move a mass on frictionless surface in a vacuum chamber

In summary, the amount of energy required to move one kilogram of mass horizontally for one meter on a perfectly frictionless surface inside a vacuum chamber will depend on the time in which the distance is covered. The more energy used, the faster the object will accelerate and the less time it will take to move one meter. However, it is unclear if there is a minimum amount of energy needed to make the mass start moving from rest on a frictionless surface. Additionally, the mass of the object may affect the amount of energy needed to move it a given distance in a certain amount of time. This is because the object's mass will determine its speed and kinetic energy as it passes the one meter point.
  • #1
How much energy is necessary to move one kilogram of mass horizontally for one meter on a perfectly frictionless surface inside a vacuum chamber?

Assuming the initial velocity of the mass is zero, the mass is at rest.
 
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  • #2
Dante Meira said:
How much energy is necessary to move one kilogram of mass horizontally for one meter on a perfectly frictionless surface inside a vacuum chamber?

Assuming the initial velocity of the mass is zero, the mass is at rest.
What are your thoughts on this?
 
  • #3
Chestermiller said:
What are your thoughts on this?

I guess the energy needed will depend on the time you want the mass to take to move that one meter. If you use little energy, the one kilogram mass will accelerate less and will take more time to move one meter. The more energy you use, more the one kilogram mass will accelerate, and it will take less time to move one meter horizontally.

But I wonder if there is a minimal bound in how much energy is needed to make the one kilogram mass start to move from rest on an frictionless horizontal surface in a chamber with no air resistance.

If you apply a very small force (microNewtons) for just a very brief moment (microsseconds) will that be enough to move the one kilogram mass from rest? Will it start to move horizontally in a frictionless environment, even if in a very slow speed?
 
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  • #4
Dante Meira said:
If you apply a very small force (microNewtons) for just a very brief moment (microsseconds) will that be enough to move the one kilogram mass from rest? Will it start to move?
What is the net force on the object? What does Newton's second law say about this situation?

After you're done applying this small force for a short time... what does Newton's first law say about the motion of the object?
 
  • #5
The object is at rest and the only force applied is this small force for a small amount of time, in a direction parallel to the ground.

What I really want to know is: in this case, will the mass of the object have any effect on the energy necessary to move the object one meter in a given period of time?

For example: in the same vacuum chamber with no air resistance and with perfectly frictionless surface, we put two objects of the same volume and shape, but with different densities, so one of them weights one kilogram, and the other weights 20 kilograms. Considering no friction at all (not even from air) and horizontal movement (in relation to gravity, that is: not "against" gravity and not in the direction of gravity, but neutral), and supposing we want to move the two objects one meter in 10 seconds, will it be necessary to use more energy to move the 20 kg object than the 1 kg object?

That's my doubt.
 
  • #6
Dante Meira said:
The object is at rest and the only force applied is this small force for a small amount of time, in a direction parallel to the ground.

What I really want to know is: in this case, will the mass of the object have any effect on the energy necessary to move the object one meter in a given period of time?
What is the smallest number greater than zero?
 
  • #7
Dante Meira said:
What I really want to know is: in this case, will the mass of the object have any effect on the energy necessary to move the object one meter in a given period of time?
That is a different question than you asked in your first post. To answer this one you'll want to consider the speed of the object as it passes the one meter point, and what that says about its kinetic energy.
 

1. How do you move a mass on a frictionless surface in a vacuum chamber?

To move a mass on a frictionless surface in a vacuum chamber, you would need to apply an external force to the mass. This force could come from an external source, such as a motor or a person pushing the mass, or it could come from an internal source, such as a compressed gas or an electric field.

2. What is the purpose of using a frictionless surface in a vacuum chamber?

The purpose of using a frictionless surface in a vacuum chamber is to eliminate any external forces that may impede the movement of the mass. By eliminating friction and air resistance, the mass can move freely and any external forces can be accurately measured or controlled.

3. What are the advantages of conducting experiments on a frictionless surface in a vacuum chamber?

Conducting experiments on a frictionless surface in a vacuum chamber allows for more precise and accurate results. Without the interference of friction and air resistance, the movement of the mass can be purely influenced by the applied force, making it easier to gather data and draw conclusions.

4. What kind of materials are used to create a frictionless surface in a vacuum chamber?

Materials that are commonly used to create a frictionless surface in a vacuum chamber include Teflon, graphite, and polished metal surfaces. These materials have low coefficients of friction, meaning they produce very little resistance when in contact with other surfaces.

5. Are there any real-world applications for moving a mass on a frictionless surface in a vacuum chamber?

Yes, there are many real-world applications for this type of experiment. For example, it can be used to study the motion of objects in space where there is no air resistance, or to test the performance of vehicles and machinery in low-friction environments. It can also be used in the development and testing of new technologies, such as high-speed trains and magnetic levitation systems.

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