Newtonian Mechanics and Forces Problem

In summary, the conversation is discussing a physics problem involving finding tensions and acceleration in a system with stationary rectangles and massless, frictionless pulleys. The problem is solved using given masses and friction values, resulting in an acceleration of 2.613 m/s^2 and tensions of 12.413 N, 27.438 N, 5.878 N, and 35.93 N. There is also a discussion about a discrepancy in one of the equations, which is resolved. The individual asking for help has checked their answers and believes they are correct.
  • #1
Axecutioner
32
0
Problem, Work, and Solution: http://img375.imageshack.us/img375/9987/physicsfinal.png (You can zoom in if needed)

Sorry for not using the template, this was done in MS Paint and I didn't want to have to type it all out again... Basically, the problem is to find all tensions (ropes/strings are massless) and the acceleration of the system, all in terms of given masses and frictions. The large rectangles are stationary and the circles are massless, frictionless pulleys.

I'd really appreciate if someone could check over this, I did myself more than once and also with numbers, assuming m1 = 1kg, m2 = 2kg, etc and μ = 0.5, it came out to be...
a = 2.613 m/s^2
T1 = 12.413 N
T2 = 27.438 N
T3 = 5.878 N
T4 = 35.93 N
...which seems right because m3 will actually lessen the tension on T3 but T4 will still have to pull all 5 masses so it's higher. Based on the reasonable masses I used and pretty average friction value, I think my answers are right but I still want to be sure.

Thanks!
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Anyone? This is due Monday...
 
  • #3
Equation for acceleration looks right to me.

For T1 however it should be this in my opinion

m1 a = t1 - m1 g

EDIT: Oh, it's the same as yours. Sorry!
T2 also is fine and so should be the rest.
 
Last edited:

Related to Newtonian Mechanics and Forces Problem

1. What is Newtonian Mechanics?

Newtonian Mechanics, also known as classical mechanics, is a branch of physics that studies the motion of objects and the forces that cause this motion. It was developed by Sir Isaac Newton in the 17th century and is based on three laws of motion.

2. What are the three laws of motion?

The three laws of motion, also known as Newton's Laws, are the fundamental principles of Newtonian Mechanics. The first law states that an object at rest will remain at rest, and an object in motion will remain in motion at a constant velocity unless acted upon by an external force. The second law states that the force applied to an object is directly proportional to its mass and acceleration. The third law states that for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.

3. How do forces affect motion?

Forces can cause changes in an object's motion. They can speed up, slow down, or change the direction of an object's movement. In Newtonian Mechanics, forces are described as a push or pull acting on an object and are measured in units of Newtons (N).

4. What is the difference between weight and mass?

Weight and mass are often confused, but they are not the same. Mass is a measure of the amount of matter in an object, while weight is a measure of the force of gravity acting on an object. Mass is constant, while weight can change depending on the gravitational pull of a planet or object.

5. How do you calculate force?

Force is calculated using Newton's second law, which states that force (F) is equal to the mass (m) of an object multiplied by its acceleration (a). This can be expressed as F=ma. Force can also be calculated by multiplying an object's mass by the acceleration due to gravity (9.8 m/s² on Earth).

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
9
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
504
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
973
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
10
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
3K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
8
Views
2K
Back
Top