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Recycled acidic water evaporation / condensation

  1. Nov 23, 2016 #1
    I would like to recycle a source of used water at work. The water is contaminated with an acid solution and other chemicals used in a powdercoating process. My question is -- if I were to evaporate the water and then turn it back to condensate, would the water be pure? or would the acid and other chemicals be carried over?
    thanks in anticipation of a learned response.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 23, 2016 #2

    Bystander

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    "Pure?" Sounds as though you want to design a "fractional distillation apparatus" but aren't certain what parameters determine the performance of said apparatus;
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fractional_distillation
    .
     
  4. Nov 24, 2016 #3
    Hi thanks for the reply. I'm not trying to separate the component parts, I am hoping merely to evaporate the "dirty" water and then condense it in the hope that any acid would be left behind. My plan involves pumping the liquid up to a thin tank mounted in the roof space where the temperature is 100' C with the aid of a small vacuum pump drop the pressure and then condense the resulting steam ready for re-use . ?
     
  5. Nov 24, 2016 #4

    russ_watters

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    This is very process specific, but in general, yes, the acid vapors will condense too.
     
  6. Nov 25, 2016 #5
    thanks Russ not the answer I was hoping for but much appreciated non the less
     
  7. Nov 25, 2016 #6
    Just a thought seeing as bystander mentioned it. Would the acid vapors condense at a substantially different temperature to the water? or would it be easier to neutralize the acid first by dosing?
     
  8. Nov 25, 2016 #7

    russ_watters

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    They could, yes, but typically you only have ambient temperatures available unless you intend to put a cooling coil (or several) in the duct.
    Not sure what that means -- weak on the chemistry...
     
  9. Nov 26, 2016 #8

    Bystander

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    Without knowing the specific acid, or base selected to neutralize it, or concentrations, it's really difficult to say. You may be "protecting" a proprietary process, or you may be groping about in the dark.
     
  10. Nov 26, 2016 #9
    Groping is probably nearest the mark, thanks again, think I will do some more research and I'll be back ... cheers
     
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