Solid sphere rolling along a track

In summary, the conversation discusses the conservation of energy and the potential height of a ball after it leaves a track. It is determined that the ball will continue to rotate even after it stops moving vertically, resulting in less kinetic energy and a lower final height.
  • #1
JessicaHelena
188
3

Homework Statement


Please see the attached file.

Homework Equations


Ei = Ef

The Attempt at a Solution


I don't have an answer key provided, but I'd really like to verify that I'm right (or if I'm wrong, why). I think ti'd be (c) because assuming that due to inertia, B will continue going straight up (even though gravity will decelerate its motion). When it finally stops moving, it will have 0 KE, but assuming the energy is conserved, it should have the same amount of mechanical energy as it did in A. Since at A, the ball had only gravitational potential energy (mgh), at its highest point in air, it too should have mgh and thus the same height as point A.

Would that be right?
 

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  • #2
No, it would not be right. Will the ball be rotating after it leaves the track?
 
  • #3
@Chestermiller — ah, it'd keep rotating even when it's stopped moving vertically, and so with less KE available "initially", the mgh will be less as well and thus the height will be less than the original height. Is that better?
 
  • #4
JessicaHelena said:
@Chestermiller — ah, it'd keep rotating even when it's stopped moving vertically, and so with less KE available "initially", the mgh will be less as well and thus the height will be less than the original height. Is that better?
If I understand you correctly, yes.
 
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Related to Solid sphere rolling along a track

1. What is a solid sphere rolling along a track?

A solid sphere rolling along a track is a physical phenomenon where a solid ball or sphere moves along a track or surface due to the force of gravity or external forces. The rolling motion of the sphere is a combination of translational and rotational motion, where the sphere is both moving forward and rotating as it moves along the track.

2. What factors affect the speed of a solid sphere rolling along a track?

The speed of a solid sphere rolling along a track is affected by several factors, including the mass and size of the sphere, the slope of the track, the surface of the track, and the presence of any external forces such as friction or air resistance. These factors can either increase or decrease the speed of the sphere rolling along the track.

3. How does friction affect a solid sphere rolling along a track?

Friction is a force that resists the motion of an object, and it can significantly affect the speed and motion of a solid sphere rolling along a track. Friction between the sphere and the track can slow down the rolling motion, while friction between the track and the ground can help maintain the sphere's speed and direction.

4. What is the relationship between the shape of the track and the motion of the solid sphere?

The shape of the track can greatly influence the motion of a solid sphere rolling along it. A curved track, such as a loop, can cause the sphere to accelerate due to the force of gravity. A flat track or a track with inclines can also affect the sphere's motion, depending on the slope and angle of the track.

5. How is the energy of a solid sphere rolling along a track conserved?

The energy of a solid sphere rolling along a track is conserved due to the principle of conservation of energy. As the sphere rolls along the track, its potential energy is converted to kinetic energy, and vice versa. Any external forces, such as friction, can also affect the energy of the sphere, but the total energy of the system is always conserved.

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