The Food Thread part 2

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  • #451
BWV
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That sounds really good, I think I'll make that.

forgot to mention another variant has (unsalted) peanuts as well
 
  • #452
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I'm going vegan for 6 days a week. I'm thinking unsweetened soy milk will give me the protien needed.

I'm trying to rule out why my stomach is getting so big. People are noticing. I want to rule out allergies from dairy. I'm doing the 'one meal a day' omad diet.

If I still have a gut with zero body fat, I can rule out viseral fat around my organs.

I love vegan meals. Mainly broccoli with a splash of olive oil and lemon dressing with peanuts, blueberries and whatever else tastes good.

I'm a little worried it maybe ascites that's blowing out my belly.

Even on a low fat diet, the body can turn protien into calories.

You can drop a pound a day on omad, but you need to do a workout or your body will burn your muscles as well as your stored fat for glucose.

So yeah, no dairy, meat or sugar until I figure this out.
 
  • #453
Klystron
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Not completely vegan but dropped most meat from diet. I have tried each of the locally available vegan burgers. The 'Beyond' burgers are edible but contain small nuggets/chunks reminiscent of soft bone fragments in poorly ground beef or venison. My current favorite are the Impossible' burger patties.

Apply garlic olive oil* to both sides of Impossible patty and place on oven pan.
Bake/broil (I use an electric convection oven) at ~350 F for 30 minutes max.
Turn ~10 minutes or about 1/3 of total cooking time depending on patty initial temperature.

Serve on fresh whole-grain hamburger bun w/ dijon mustard and fresh tomato slices. They taste delicious, better than most beef IMO. Can cook directly from freezer.

*Chop fresh garlic cloves fine or use food processor (easiest). Mix in ~2 cups virgin olive oil for each full head of garlic. Store in sealed glass jar in refrigerator. Apply to burgers or buns (if toasted) w/ flat knife. (Option: add paprika a/o cayenne to oil to taste and to help preserve.)
 
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  • #454
My homemade recipe that I love:
Big skillet with three teaspoons of conola oil filled with brussel sprouts cut in half then I put a quarter of bacon crumbles, a small diced onion, diced cabbage, cilantro, cashews, and sesame seeds.

Nice to see EVO here!:smile:
 
  • #455
Vegetarian chilli ~ One of my weekend delights. :)
The easiest chilli you'll ever make, with ready-to-eat grains, kidney beans in chilli sauce and summer veggies.

Ingredients
400g pack oven-roasted vegetables
1 can kidney beans in chilli sauce
1 can chopped tomatoes
1 ready-to-eat mixed grain pouch

Method
STEP 1
Heat oven to 200C/180C fan/ gas 6. Cook the vegetables in a casserole dish for 15 mins. Tip in the beans and tomatoes, season, and cook for another 10-15 mins until piping hot. Heat the pouch in the microwave on High for 1 min and serve with the chilli.
 
  • #456
Klystron
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My preferred veggie burger from Impossible Foods can be quite expensive, ~$3.00 to 4.00 USD per burger. Kroger stores currently offer a special 10-pack of Beyond burgers for $10.00 USD, or $1 per burger. So, I have reconsidered my previous post.

The Beyond burgers are significantly thicker and 'meatier' than the Impossible product. I altered the cooking regime to allow for the greater thickness, extracting more oils during the process. The extended broiling with slightly increased garlic oil produced a tasty burger without the annoying 'chewy bits'. Given the larger size and lower price advantages, I now like Beyond as much as Impossible.

N.B.: Broiling/baking Beyond burgers produces a strong slightly unpleasant odor during cooking that does not affect the final taste. So, I cook them slowly and ventilate thoroughly. Bon appétit.
 
  • #457
hutchphd
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A well-made simple pot of green lentils is as good as it gets. I start with a mirepoix and add garlic a can of tomatoes, a sweet potato and a white potato, some raisons and the lentils. Spice generously with thyme and curry powder. Cook 45 min. Finish with a splash of vinegar and hit it lightly with a stick blender. Spectacular over Bismati rice. It will turn you vegetarian. Personally I am not a fan of the meatless meat but I am not completely vegetarian.
 
  • #458
Klystron
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... I start with a mirepoix and add garlic ...{snip}
The basis for so many great recipes. I think Julia Child remarked to Jacques Pepin that nearly any (edible meat or veg) cooked with garlic in mirepois should taste good.

One of my favorite mirepois: diced carrot, celery, brown onion, and jalapeno peppers sauteed with garlic.
Add tomatoes to prepare pasta sauce or chile.
Add potatoes, shallots and leeks for various soups.
Mix into legumes (dhal) including lentils, chickpeas, pintos, peas or any tasty bean.
Cook with almost any meat or fish, as Julia remarked.

Yes, I grew up eating meat but now eat mostly vegetarian and vegan for health and ecological concerns. I like cooking veggie burgers when too tired to prepare a fresh vegetarian meal.

Is it just me or does most store bought meat lack flavor?
 
  • #459
hutchphd
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Is it just me or does most store bought meat lack flavor?
I eat very little meat anymore. I don't know whether it has changed or I have. I do still eat and crave cheese.
Incidentally the lentil recipe is particularly good because of the traditional French beginnings (with lotsa Thyme) combined with the curry/ sweet raisons and the vinegar finish. A cut above.
I am also very fond of (African inspired) vegetarian ground nut stews with sweet potato peanut and garlic and chili.
 
  • #460
BWV
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Been dabbling w/ Indian cooking and fwiw it seems ginger is always used in about equal parts w garlic (Indian stores sell ginger-garlic paste which works well enough)

a good S Indian base for curries is
Ginger, garlic, onion, curry leaves, green chiles (Serrano or jalapeño w/o seeds and placenta), tomato w/ either virgin(not toasted) sesame oil or coconut oil

my favorite on top of that is chettinadu mix of star anise, cinnamon (Ceylon), cloves, green cardamom seeds and dried red chilies
 
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  • #461
Klystron
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Been dabbling w/ Indian cooking and fwiw it seems ginger is always used in about equal parts w garlic (Indian stores sell ginger-garlic paste which works well enough)
{snip}
My son, who essentially grew up in one of his mother's Thai-themed restaurants, created a derisive term for premixed packaged components "gang in a box"; 'gang' sounds like the Thai word for curry.

The difference between fresh prepared ingredients and processed-packaged is like the difference between someone describing a song by Iron Butterfly and experiencing a live performance of "Inna Gadda da Vida" with dueling drummers.

As a simple saucier, the nuances of fresh curry escape my abilities to prepare but not to enjoy. My late wife would often spend an entire day preparing fresh ingredients purchased in early morning 'chef hours', bending the recipes gleaned from coded cookbooks passed down through her Chinese father to fit locally available items and the tastes of those she fed; always hiding at least one ingredient or method from prying eyes lest her secrets escape.
 
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  • #462
Astronuc
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  • #463
Klystron
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On a somewhat different, but related topic, I'm trying to figure out the seasoning used for fragrant rice. I'm thinking cardamom, or perhaps tamarind.
I tend to prefer naturally fragrant rice such as Indian basmati and Thai jasmine rice as foundation and mitigation of often fiery sauces. I usually reserve tamarind and fruit peels for sauces.

Cardamom and anise work well in steamed rice as they do in baking. Clove works best IMO. Merely drop 1-2 whole cloves per cup of dry rice. Keep count and retrieve the hard cloves before serving the rice. Many other hard spices and seeds also work this way, most noticeably cinnamon bark.

My favorite rice spice has to be saffron derived from crocus buds. If one is lucky and wealthy enough to cook rice with actual saffron, I advise not using any other ingredients aside from a few raw cashews or a single clove in order to savor the magnificent aroma and color. Saffron from California crocus buds remains a less expensive alternative with excellent gold-red color but less flavor and aroma.

For day-to-day nothing-special basmati rice I use a rice cooker with 2-1 filtered water to washed rice. Add ~1/4 teaspoon tumeric powder per cup of rice for color, flavor, preservation and health. Add 2 whole cloves per cup if desired plus your preferred hard spices. Keep count and retrieve hard bits before serving.

Fancy rice pilaf: soak, wash and drain several cups of fine rice. Melt clarified butter (ghee) in large frying pan on medium-low flame. Substitute olive oil for vegan. Sautee preferred spices. Add ~1 cup chopped onion to each 2 cups drained rice. Lightly brown/wilt onions. Add rice slowly. Sautee over medium heat while constantly turning mixture.

When sufficiently mixed slowly add warm clarified chicken broth or stock (vegetable stock for vegan) to rice ~2 to 1 broth-rice. For pilaf bring to mild boil, tightly cover and reduce heat to minimum. Steam ~~15 minutes for al dente.

For risotto do not cover, keep stirring over low-medium heat adding broth/stock/water to desired consistency al dente. Use a wooden paddle to stir risotto. Add chopped fresh herbs in final minutes such as basil, parsley, saffron (!), spinach leaves, etc. and optional sauteed garlic and mushrooms.

For soup continue as for risotto but continue adding hot broth/stock plus other soup ingredients such as mushrooms, diced vegetables and (non vegan) chicken, fish or shrimp. Do not overcook!

Leftover steamed rice, pilaf and risotto make great fried rice. Lightly sautee with maripois and bingo!

See also Saffron trade - Wikipedia
 
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  • #464
Astronuc
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I was listening to an interview with Eric Ripert this morning. He has written a new recipe book, which contains rather simple recipes. Anyway, I thought I'd look into him and found the following.


"It is not possible to be angry and happy and the same time, and happiness is never born from anger." Eric Ripert

I loved Anthony Bourdain's show, "Parts Unknown", and I was impressed by his friendship with Eric Ripert. The show was not just about food, but the experiences with different cultures and sharing it with others.

José Andrés was another good friend.





Lessons from Anthony Bourdain

"Be curious, humble, generous, . . . . " Eric Ripert about Bourdain.

"Never be passive when you see injustice . . . " José Andrés
 
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