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Toroidal coil winding

  1. Aug 29, 2006 #1
    Hey Everyone,

    I recently got a hold of a coupe of toroidal cores that I want to wind some wire on (see pic). They are roughly 2.5" OD, 1" ID, 1" thk. I plan to wind two coils of 20 gauge magnet wire onto them but I was wondering if anyone here knows how the factory-made ones are wound? Do they have some kind of special jig to do it or are these things still hand-wound? If there is a winding jig, how does it work, I am thinking about trying to make one but I'm not sure how I would do it.

    Thanks,
    Jason O
     

    Attached Files:

  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 29, 2006 #2
    I found this video here showing a toridal winding machine:

    http://www.gormanmachine.com/videos/proii/proii.htm

    but I am still having a hard time seeing how they are getting the wire off of the spinning spool without it tangling on the spool along the way... any thoughts?
     
  4. Aug 30, 2006 #3

    Danger

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    It won't play for me. :frown:
    Your link gives a blank screen, with the text below. When I went back to the home page and clicked on the item, it gave a still picture, but returned to a blank screen when I tried to run it. It might just be a Mac-unfriendly site, so I'll try again when I get to work. I certainly want to see this thing in action.
     
  5. Aug 30, 2006 #4
    Hi Danger,

    I hope you can see the video, it is very cool how they figured out how to do that :smile:. While I was looking around for someone who could explain it to me, I came across a comment someone made about the winding mechanism being similer to that of a sewing machine. So I went to HowStuffWorks.com and checked out this article here: http://home.howstuffworks.com/sewing-machine.htm.

    The lock-stitch mechanism seems to be closest to what might be happening with the toroidal winders as far as the wire comming off the spool is concerned. Any thoughts? Ideally, I would like to try to make a simplified version of this for myself.

    - Jason O
     
  6. Aug 30, 2006 #5

    Danger

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    Okay, the PC at work plays it. Unfortunately, I can't really see what the thing is doing. It certainly looks very cool, though. What I can't figure out just now is how it can use something like the lock-stitch without the second wire messing with the field lines from the first one. Maybe they just connect them in parallel and treat the two as one big wire?
    Now I'll have to find a commercial toroid somewhere and take it apart to see what's what. :biggrin:
     
  7. Aug 30, 2006 #6
    Hi Danger,

    The winding machine doesn't actually use two wires like the lock-stitch uses two threads. I was concentrating on the bottom half of the sewing machine with the rotating bobin that the lower set of wires is fed off of. I was saying that the big metal spool that the wire is fed onto the toroid from might work in the same way that the bobbin feeds the thread off. I noticed in one of the videos that you can see a black thing that was spinning with the metal ring holding the wires, I liken that to the shuttle-hook mechanism that spins the thread off of the bobbin.

    - Jason O
     
  8. Aug 30, 2006 #7

    Danger

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    It's actually a lot easier to see what's happening in the video of the taping machine; it's moving slower. Still can't quite make it out, though. I'll have a go at designing one that you can build yourself. It might not work the same way as theirs, but it'll do the job. Don't worry about manufacturing capability; I always design my stuff using common pre-made parts such as from VCR's, typewriters and cars. I just have to sketch it up the way that I want it first, then modify it to fit what I have lying around.
    This might take me a few days.
     
  9. Aug 30, 2006 #8

    berkeman

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    The winding machine we use (Jovil Universal) first puts the wire onto a circular shuttle ring, and then that is spun around the toroid to wind the core. The wire is kind of spiralled inside of the shuttle (which is a hollow ring about 3cm in overall diameter and about 2mm in inner diameter size), and the shuttle ring has a split so that it can be put over the toroid after the wire has been spiralled into it. Here's their website, but they don't seem to show any closeups of the winding head and shuttle:

    http://www.jovil.com/

    For your hand wiring, you need to put the length of wire onto some sort of spool that is small enough to fit through the center of the toroid. That way you can keep passing the bulk of the wire through the center of the toroid as you wind it.
     
  10. Aug 30, 2006 #9
    Hi Danger,

    I'll be happy to see what you come up with, I'm still pondering a way to do it as well (besides manually of course).

    @berkeman

    That’s great that you have access to one of those things. Though I must say that I am still having a hard time visualizing the mechanism at work. How can you put the shuttle ring through the toroid once the wire is fed through it? Is there anyway you could make a sketch of how it is supposed to work, or take a few close up photos of the actual machine? That would help tremendously.

    Thanks,
    Jason O
     
  11. Aug 30, 2006 #10

    berkeman

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    I'll try in words first. Imagine a bigger version of the shuttle ring, say you took a drinking straw and could bend it into a circle with a small gap left. You take the magnet wire, and form it into a tight spiral the same size as the inside diameter of the straw, and push the spiral of wire into the straw from one end. You end up with a long spiral of wire through the length of the straw, with the final end of the wire sticking out of one end. You are limited in how much wire you can pre-stage in the shuttle ring by the thickness of the wire and the size of the shuttle. This determines the max number of windings you can get on the toroid.

    Once the shuttle ring is filled with the spiral of wire, you open the split in the shuttle ring slightly so that you can put the shuttle ring over the toroid, with the split positioned in the center opening of the toroid. You then attach the spinning rubber wheel things to the shuttle ring, hold on to the exposed end of the wire, and start the machine. The rubber wheels spin the shuttle ring, while the toroid is slowly rotated by another set of wheels to evenly distribute the windings.

    So the whole trick to this particular toroid winding machine is how they spiral the wire into the inside of the shuttle ring prior to doing the winding step. As I said, winding any toroid involves putting the wire on something that you can then pass through the middle of the toroid multiple times. In your case, that would probably just be a small spool.
     
  12. Aug 31, 2006 #11
    berkeman, excellent job explaining that. I can visualize the whole setup without confusion.

    I'm impressed by the cleverness of whoever figured out how to do it that way.
     
  13. Aug 31, 2006 #12
    Hi Berkeman,

    Thank you for the detailed explanation, that cleared it up for me :-).

    - Jason O
     
  14. Sep 3, 2006 #13

    Danger

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    Well... this is turning out to be a bit stickier than I'd anticipated, but I'm still working on it. Beginning practical experiments to test out a couple of ideas. Stayed tuned. :biggrin:
     
  15. Sep 3, 2006 #14
    Alrighty :smile:
     
  16. Sep 5, 2006 #15

    Danger

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    Plan 'A' -- dismal failure :redface:
    Plan 'B' -- dismal failure :grumpy:
    Plan 'C' -- showing promise, but harder to make :rolleyes:
     
  17. Sep 5, 2006 #16

    NoTime

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    :rofl: If you're not making mistakes, you're not doing anything!
    The key is to not keep making the same mistake :biggrin:
     
  18. Sep 5, 2006 #17

    Danger

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    I almost never make the same mistake twice, but I have some kind of record for the number made the first time. :biggrin:
     
  19. Sep 5, 2006 #18

    NoTime

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    Busy guy :cool:

    After you beat me with your dinner table, I don't think I'm going chalange your claim :bugeye: :biggrin:
     
  20. Sep 5, 2006 #19

    Danger

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    :rofl:
    I'd forgotten about that.
     
  21. Sep 5, 2006 #20

    berkeman

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    Um, it's just wire guys.
     
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