Troubleshooting Electric Flux Calculation on a Square Surface

In summary, the conversation discusses using the formula (E * Area * cos(theta)) to calculate the electric flux through a square surface immersed in a uniform electric field. There is confusion over the correct angle to use and the potential for the result to be negative depending on the direction of the electric field. A drawing or picture is needed for a clearer understanding of the problem.
  • #1
Rave Grrl
10
0
I used the formula (E * Area * cos(theta)) and got the wrong answer (.02529) and I really don't understand why. I need help

The square surface shown measures 4.0 mm on each side. It is immersed in a uniform electric field with magnitude E = 1930 N/C. The field lines make an angle of 35° with a normal to the surface, as shown. Take the normal to be "outward," as though the surface were one face of a box. Calculate the electric flux through the surface.
 
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  • #2
It looks correct (probably not the final #).U may have to check the units ([itex] \left(1\mbox{mm})\right)^{2}=10^{-6} \mbox{m}^{2} [/itex]...

Daniel.
 
  • #3
35 degrees to the normal is 55 degrees to the surface. Did you try that?
 
  • #4
Halls,she needs the scalar product between the electric field vector and the normal to the surface,which make an angle of 35° between them...

Daniel.
 
  • #5
I tried 55, and it didn't work.

Is electrical flux supposed to be negative? Thats all I can think of. I don't know if that's right.
 
  • #6
Depends on the sense of the electric field.If it enters the page or not.Your problem is pretty vague in this issue,because you haven't provided the drawing/picture.

Daniel.
 

Related to Troubleshooting Electric Flux Calculation on a Square Surface

1. What is electric flux and why is it important in scientific calculations?

Electric flux is a measure of the flow of an electric field through a given surface. It is important in scientific calculations because it helps us understand the strength and direction of an electric field, and can be used to solve problems related to electrical circuits, electromagnetic induction, and many other phenomena.

2. How is electric flux calculated on a square surface?

The electric flux through a square surface can be calculated by multiplying the magnitude of the electric field by the area of the surface and the cosine of the angle between the electric field and the surface. The formula is Φ = E*A*cos(θ), where Φ is the electric flux, E is the electric field, A is the area, and θ is the angle between the electric field and the surface.

3. What are some common errors when troubleshooting electric flux calculations on a square surface?

Some common errors when troubleshooting electric flux calculations on a square surface include using the wrong formula, using incorrect units, and not taking into account the angle between the electric field and the surface. It is also important to check for any typos or mistakes in the input values, as these can greatly affect the final result.

4. How can I ensure the accuracy of my electric flux calculation on a square surface?

To ensure the accuracy of your electric flux calculation on a square surface, it is important to double-check all input values, use the correct formula, and pay attention to units and angles. It is also helpful to perform the calculation multiple times using different methods and compare the results to ensure consistency.

5. Are there any online resources or tools that can assist with troubleshooting electric flux calculations on a square surface?

Yes, there are many online calculators and tutorials available that can assist with troubleshooting electric flux calculations on a square surface. Some examples include Wolfram Alpha, Khan Academy, and Physics Classroom. It is also helpful to consult with a physics teacher or tutor for further assistance.

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