Can vapor condensation cause significant drop in vapor flow rate?

  1. Need some help here! My plant just installed a water scrubber for controlling methanol emissions. Results obtained from stack tests have consistently shown the flow rate of the gasses from the scrubber outlet is about 30% of gas flow rate into the scrubber. From process knowledge, most of the vapor is methanol.

    Further, Lab analysis on the scrubbing liquid shows as much as 20% methanol concentration (200,000 PPM) before it is changed out with fresh water. Stack tests also show an average 95% reduction in ppm measured from the inlet and outlet vents. Clearly, there is some MeOH removal going on.

    My problem is this: How do I go about proving that the flow loss is due to condensation and absorption of methanol in the water?

    I will like to start with some qualitative argument and then, support it with some calculations if required. Is there some literature out there that can help?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. SteamKing

    SteamKing 9,612
    Staff Emeritus
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    Isn't that what the scrubber system is for, to remove the methanol before it goes up the stack? Or do you think someone is stealing methanol?
     
  4. SteamKing, Thanks.

    Mass flow into the scrubber should equal mass flow out. Flow rate of the gasses from the scrubber outlet is about 30% of gas flow rate into the scrubber. I am looking for a method hopefully to prove that the loss of flow (about 70%) is due to methanol condensation.

    Thanks again.
     
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