Classical Physics Forum

Join expert classical physics discussion on the principles developed before the rise of relativity and quantum mechanics. Including mechanics, electrodynamics, thermodynamics, optics.
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Classical Physics

Welcome to the Classical Physics forum!

Classical physics refers to the traditional theories and principles of physics developed before the advent of quantum mechanics and relativity in the early 20th century. It includes classical mechanics, electromagnetism, and thermodynamics.

Classical mechanics, formulated by Newton, describes the motion of objects and the forces acting upon them. Maxwell's equations encompass classical electromagnetism, elucidating the behavior of electric and magnetic fields. Thermodynamics, developed by Carnot and others, focuses on the principles governing heat, work, and energy transfer in macroscopic systems.

While highly successful in explaining everyday phenomena, classical physics encountered limitations at extreme scales, leading to the development of quantum mechanics and relativity to describe the behavior of particles at the atomic and cosmic levels, respectively.
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