periodic table

It’s Elemental! The Periodic Table Quiz

The periodic table is something we all are made aware of early in schooling, but have you really looked at it closely and learned about it’s lessor known facts? Let’s find out!

Did you know?

There are many periodic tables with structures different than that of the standard form we use today. Within 100 years of the creation of Mendeleev’s table in 1869 it has been calculated that atleast 700 other periodic table versions were introduced.

1. How many elements appear in nature?

 
 
 
 

2. What was the first element to be made artificially?

 
 
 
 

3. The lightest of all metals is

 
 
 
 

4. The Periodic Table Of Elements Was Inspired By What?

 
 
 
 

5. Which is not a noble gas?

 
 
 
 

6. How many elements make up the Actinide series

 
 
 
 

7. What block are hydrogen and helium in?

 
 
 
 

8. The original periodic table was first proposed by Russian chemist Dmitri Mendeleev in

 
 
 
 

9. Which is the the rarest element on earth

 
 
 
 

10. The only letter not in the periodic table is the letter

 
 
 
 

11. The country Argentina is named after the element

 
 
 
 

12. Although there is helium on Earth, it was first discovered by observing

 
 
 
 

Ready for your next quiz? How well do you know about the LHC?

49 replies
  1. Cytoplasm says:

    Congratulations – you have completed Periodic Table Quiz.

    You scored 8 points out of 12 points total.

    Your performance has been rated as [B]Competent.[/B]

    For most of the incorrect responses, #4, #9, #11 – did not have sufficient information to make a correct selection. Probability did not land in my favor.
    For #6, the info seemed present but not to the point of selection of the correct answer. The kind of question I intend to focus on to improve problem-solving skills.

    So 1 to 2 semi-guess / estimates that turned out correct. #2 and #7.
    6 correct responses from high level of certainty of knowledge. #1, #3, #5, #8, #10, #12.
    [B][/B]

  2. Silicon Waffle says:

    6 at most and doing it again right after that results in only 3 or 4, something really wrong with my mind. I really love to work with those who could reach up 8-12 :nb)

  3. MexChemE says:

    Congratulations – you have completed Periodic Table Quiz.

    You scored 8 points out of 12 points total.

    Your performance has been rated as [B]Competent[/B].

  4. Stephanus says:

    [QUOTE=”PAllen, post: 5104920, member: 275028″]I missed year of periodic table, first element synthesized, and which letter wasn’t in the periodic table.[/QUOTE]
    Ha, ha, I beat you in this area. It’s J.
    But for the other answers? Flunked many of them :oldlaugh:

  5. DaveC426913 says:

    [QUOTE=”BiGyElLoWhAt, post: 5108482, member: 496972″]Apparently people didn’t read the did you know? The date for the first periodic table by mendleev is given before you take the quiz =P
    [/QUOTE]
    D’oh!!

    I may not read ‘Did You Know’s, but I do read all the comments in a thread.

    I was making a mental note to complain specifically about #8 – I thought it was too hard – either you know it or you don’t. Did not realize it was the easiest of all! :oops:

    Well played. Well played.

    8/12. I actually missed one question (#9) without realizing it. Guessed at several.

  6. 256bits says:

    A 10/12 .
    4 correct no guess.
    4 educated half guesses turned out correct
    2 complete guess turned out correct.
    More luck than brains, as they say.

  7. certainly says:

    [QUOTE=”DrDu, post: 5105024, member: 210532″]I am not so sure about whether Np or Fr is more rare in nature. Np is produced by neutron capture by Uranium. The neutrons stem from spontaneous fission of Uranium. With this hindsight, also the answer “90” in question 1 is more convention than fact.[/QUOTE]
    I suppose we would also have to consider the Neptunium released into the environment due to nuclear explosions. ([URL=’http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neptunium#Occurrence’]see this[/URL])

  8. certainly says:

    [QUOTE=”Borek, post: 5104972, member: 23711″]And what is the correct answer to 10 (the only letter not in the periodic table)? I can’t think of an element with J nor Q within the symbol.[/QUOTE]
    This is just a guess, but perhaps that question was inspired by temporary element names like Ununquadium, and so the answer must be J.
    However that name has been replaced by Flerovium ([URL=’http://www.iupac.org/news/news-detail/article/element-114-is-named-flerovium-and-element-116-is-named-livermorium.html’]see here[/URL]), after the Russian laboratory (whose name in turn was inspired by the physicist Georgy Flyorov) that discovered it in 1998.

  9. Greg Bernhardt says:

    [QUOTE=”Ygggdrasil, post: 5104890, member: 124113″]I’m not sure #9 is correct given that you give ununoctium as a potential answer. Whereas there are maybe only a few ounces of francium, there have probably been only a handful of atoms of Uuo ever made (though Fr might be the better answer given that there probably isn’t any Uuo on Earth at the moment, and according to the IUPAC, Uuo has not been discovered yet).[/QUOTE]
    Good call, I’ll correct it

  10. Ygggdrasil says:

    [quote]
    Congratulations – you have completed Periodic Table Quiz.

    You scored 10 points out of 11 points total.

    Your performance has been rated as [B]Excellent[/B].[/quote]

    That’s strange because there are 12 total questions. I missed #4 (what did Mendeleev base the periodic table on) and #9 (rarest element). I correctly guessed on #8 (date of the periodic table).

    I’m not sure #9 is correct given that you give ununoctium as a potential answer. Whereas there are maybe only a few ounces of francium, there have probably been only a handful of atoms of Uuo ever made (though Fr might be the better answer given that there probably isn’t any Uuo on Earth at the moment, and according to the IUPAC, Uuo has not been discovered yet).

  11. Mr.Robot says:

    Congratulations – you have completed Periodic Table Quiz.You scored 12 points out of 12 points total.Your performance has been rated as Unbeatable.please make corrections.. Hydrogen is in s-block and Helium is in p-block.

  12. eric6s says:

    It seems to me that the lightest of all metals is solid Hydrogen, that is, when pressures are high enough, and temperatures are low enough as we see in the cores of gas giants Jupiter and Saturn.  When pressures are low, and temperatures are high, all metals become a liquid, and then (in the extreme) a gas. The lightest solid metal at normal temperatures and pressures is certainly Lithium, but that's not what the question asks, is it?

  13. Derek Bolton says:

    One small gripe: a lessor is someone who leases.  Try lesser.Btw, Mendeleev almost lost primacy over a mistranslation of periodic into German.  Google "fontani mendeleev periodic mistranslated russian"

  14. Ibix says:

    9/12. Two were educated guesses. I'm ashamed to say I didn't get the year Mendeleev proposed the table even though it's written at the top, as a previous poster noted. The other two I got wrong were the first artificial element and the rarest element

  15. stateofdogma says:

    Congratulations – you have completed Periodic Table Quiz.You scored 8 points out of 12 points total.Your performance has been rated as Competent.I guess on alot of the questions

  16. BiGyElLoWhAt says:

    8/12Apparently people didn't read the did you know? The date for the first periodic table by mendleev is given before you take the quiz =P Trick Questions OP

  17. dallasplowboy says:

    I'll have to get my #1 son the ChemE to answer, I always thought that the table wasn't logical and or missing pieces. I was right 40 years ago. So is the first composite Carbon/Carbon made for the nose cone and leading wing edges of the shuttle a top secret? Composites come out these days for hail proof car panels, fishing poles and tennis rackets; could they with stand the heat of re entry?

  18. PAllen says:

    There is also a question of what is meant by 'nature' (per the question of how many elements exist in nature). 1) Smartass observatIon: People are part of nature.2) Wouldn't a supernova temporarily produce elements even beyond what people have created (possibly reaching a theorized island of [relative] stability)? Any any given moment (spatial hypersurface) in the universe, I would presume far more than 90 elements exist (without recourse to assumptions about intelligent aliens).

  19. DrDu says:

    I am not so sure about whether Np or Fr is more rare in nature. Np is produced by neutron capture by Uranium. The neutrons stem from spontaneous fission of Uranium. With this hindsight, also the answer "90" in question 1 is more convention than fact.

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