15 of the Best PF 2017 Eclipse Photos

[Total: 14    Average: 3.6/5]

The 2017 August Eclipse really was something special. Fortunately Physics Forums has great photographers and snapped some remarkable shots. Here are a few highlights.

 

exclipse shadows

Eclipse shadows by nsaspook

 

Eclipse Shadows 2

Eclipse shadows by nsaspook

 

Eclipse shadows 3

Eclipse shadows by mech_engineer

 

stoomart

Eclipse shadows by stoomart

 

Eclipse by Andy

Eclipse by Andy Resnick

 

Eclipse by jtbell

Eclipse by jtbell

 

Eclipse by russ watters

Eclipse by russ watters

 

Eclipse by OmCheeto

Eclipse by OmCheeto

 

Eclipse by borg

Eclipse by borg

 

Eclipse by anorlunda

Eclipse by anorlunda

 

Eclipse by Janus

Eclipse by Janus

 

Eclipse by Dr Transport

Eclipse by Dr Transport

 

chronos

Eclipse by chronos

 

Eclipse by GetOffMyLawn

Eclipse by GetOffMyLawn

 

Eclipse by Morph46

Eclipse by Morph46

I have a BS in Information Sciences from UW-Milwaukee. I’ve helped manage Physics Forums for over 14 years. I enjoy learning and reading about new science developments. I have a lovely wife and a cat named Mason.
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  1. .Scott
    .Scott says:
    OmCheeto

    I found one image:

    Oh. Wait. Did you say banding? And not "handing"?

    My bad.

    In my experience, you would need a much larger area than the sheet they are using.
    I saw it on the surface of a parking lot in Virginia a few decades ago.

  2. Janus
    Janus says:

    A couple of points of interest in the photo I got. The colored dots on the edge of the disk are caused by solar prominences. ( I didn't realize this until I saw some higher res photos that showed them clearer in those positions.
    I also caught the star Regulus in the shot. it is the white dot in the lower left of the image.
    View attachment 209606

  3. OmCheeto
    OmCheeto says:
    Janus

    A couple of points of interest in the photo I got. The colored dots on the edge of the disk are caused by solar prominences. ( I didn't realize this until I saw some higher res photos that showed them clearer in those positions.
    I also caught the star Regulus in the shot. it is the white dot in the lower left of the image.
    View attachment 209606

    I also caught Regulus.

    Though, I thought I should edit the photo, as it's a bit difficult to find.

    View attachment 209609

  4. David_777
    David_777 says:

    View attachment 209611

    About 10:18am Monday August 21, 2017 from Riverfront Park within a large crowd in Salem, Oregon at the totality exit stage.
    Sony SEL55210 zoom at 210mm on A6000 , Aperture Priority, F14, Exposure Compensation -3, ISO 200, 1/5 second, Spot Auto Focus on sun/moon edge, on tripod. Cropped to 3500×4600 pixels though not tack sharp.

    Not a very serious image on my part as I don't have specialized astronomy gear. After watching eclipse totality, at end decided to try to get a single token shot during the diamond ring phase. Without much time to monkey with my camera controls I changed the Exposure Compensation from -1 where it had been prior to totality while taking crowd photos down to -3 hoping that might be about right. Was very lucky with that as histogram shows just a bit of the diamond clipping. Although I pushed my Infrared Remote Shutter just as the sun re-appeared, there is a delay so I got a larger diamond than intended but maybe that worked out for the better as it caused more rays across the face of the dark moon enhancing its graphic. Although nicely sunny clear skies, that west central Oregon region has marine air with considerable water vapor that I'd expect contributes to more atmospheric scattering rays beyond the suns own corona light. Note other post identifies the star lower left of the sun. There is also something with a blue streak at frame bottom left corner that I also saw on another photo from the Salem area? Notice the prismic colors radiating between ray bands both above and below the diamond axis? Is that also something due to polarized light from the diamond being affected by water vapor? Certainly adds a nice effect. What about the slight halo around the moon edge, is that chromatic aberation or real? On the upper left quadrant that is yellow while at lower right is blue. Below is a 100% pixels crop.

    View attachment 209612

    David

  5. Stavros Kiri
    Stavros Kiri says:
    Janus

    No, due to eruptions on the surface of the Sun like this:
    View attachment 209626

    Isn't that kind of rare? NASA on the live streaming mentioned the explanation that I quoted. I am not sure which one is true.
    [Specifically, there was a lady from NASA saying that ~"the orange/purple colour effects on the edge of the sun is just sun light escaping though the imperfections of the moon (small bites, you can see), e.g. craters etc., because the moon surface is not a perfect round …"]
    But what is definitely true is that big flares are kind of rare (not a common everyday thing). Are small eruptions visible during the eclipse, e.g. with your instrument set up? I am not sure, but I kind of doubt that.

  6. Janus
    Janus says:
    Stavros Kiri

    Isn't that kind of rare? NASA on the live streaming mentioned the explanation that I quoted. I am not sure which one is true.
    [Specifically, there was a lady from NASA saying that ~"the orange/purple colour effects on the edge of the sun is just sun light escaping though the imperfections of the moon (small bites, you can see), e.g. craters etc., because the moon surface is not a perfect round …"]
    But what is definitely true is that big flares are kind of rare (not a common everyday thing). Are small eruptions visible during the eclipse, e.g. with your instrument set up? I am not sure, but I kind of doubt that.

    I wouldn't have been sure myself but my wife came across a photo taken of this eclipse that showed the prominences like this one does from a different eclipse.
    https://cdn.vox-cdn.com/uploads/chorus_asset/file/8889861/Solar_eclipse_1999_4_NR.jpg
    and they were positioned exactly where the colored spots are in my photo.

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